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I have two arrays of some class. I want to find the difference between them. But I want it to be based on the value of a specific method call to each instance of this class, instead of the entire instance. Here is some example code where I use Hash for the class.

#!/usr/bin/ruby

require 'awesome_print'

class Hash
  def <=> other
    puts 'space ship'
    self[:a] <=> other[:a]
  end
  def == other
    puts 'double equal'
    self[:a] == other[:a]
  end
  def > other
    puts 'greater than'
    self[:a] > other[:a]
  end
  def < other
    puts 'less than'
    self[:a] < other[:a]
  end
  def >= other
    puts 'greater equal'
    self[:a] >= other[:a]
  end
  def <= other
    puts 'less equal'
    self[:a] <= other[:a]
  end
  def eql? other
    puts 'eql?'
    self[:a].eql? other[:a]
  end
  def equal? other
    puts 'equal?'
    self[:a].equal? other[:a]
  end
end

c  = { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3}
d  = { a: 2, b: 3, c: 4}
e1 = { a: 3, b: 4, c: 5}
e2 = { a: 3, b: 4, c: 5}
e3 = { a: 3, b: 5, c: 4}
f1 = { a: 4, b: 5, c: 6}
f2 = { a: 4, b: 5, c: 6}
f3 = { a: 4, b: 6, c: 5}
g  = { a: 5, b: 6, c: 7}
h  = { a: 6, b: 7, c: 8}

a = [c, d, e1, f1]
b = [e3, f3, g, h]

ap (a - b)

I expect to see 2 elements in the final array, but still seeing 4. Tried overriding all the various comparison operators for the class of each element, Hash in this case, and I can see some calls to the 'double equal', but it still doesn't have the proper effect. What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Array#- uses the eql? / hash protocol, just like Hash, Set and Array#uniq:

class Hash
  def eql? other
    puts 'eql?'
    self[:a].eql? other[:a]
  end
  def hash
    puts 'hash'
    self[:a].hash
  end
end

c  = { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3}
d  = { a: 2, b: 3, c: 4}
e1 = { a: 3, b: 4, c: 5}
e2 = { a: 3, b: 4, c: 5}
e3 = { a: 3, b: 5, c: 4}
f1 = { a: 4, b: 5, c: 6}
f2 = { a: 4, b: 5, c: 6}
f3 = { a: 4, b: 6, c: 5}
g  = { a: 5, b: 6, c: 7}
h  = { a: 6, b: 7, c: 8}

a = [c, d, e1, f1]
b = [e3, f3, g, h]

a - b
# => [{a: 1, b: 2, c: 3}, {a: 2, b: 3, c: 4}]
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Seems to work nicely. The only part that is not very intuitive to me is why use eql? as a second level check if hash between two instances are the same. Guess hash is not sufficiently strong hashing algorithm to essentially guarantee uniqueness. Thanks! – DCameronMauch Nov 23 '13 at 18:06
    
This is a fundamental property of hash functions: a hash function maps a large input space (in this case infinitely large) to a small output space, which means that there are multiple input values which map to the same output value. If the hash value is different, you know that the objects are not equal, but if it is the same, then you need to additionally check for equality. See Wikipedia.Org/wiki/Pigeonhole_principle – Jörg W Mittag Nov 23 '13 at 18:30

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