Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

let's say I have this: (numpy array)

a=
[0  1  2  3],
[4  5  6  7],
[8  9 10  11]

to get [1,1] which is 5 its diagonal is zero; according to numpy, a.diagonal(0)= [0,5,10]. How do I get the reverse or the right to left diagonal [2,5,8] for [1,1]? Is this possible? My original problem is an 8 by 8 (0:7).. I hope that helps

share|improve this question
1  
there are two answers that appear not generalized enough becuase your sample a is small. Do you want the answer for [2,2] to be [7, 10]? related question, can you be rectangular in the other direction (tall not wide)? –  Phil Cooper Nov 23 '13 at 16:46
    
My example is an 8 by 8 (0:7).. I hope that helps –  Ahmed Nassar Nov 23 '13 at 17:26

4 Answers 4

Flip the array upside-down and use the same:

np.flipud(a).diagonal(0)[::-1]
share|improve this answer

Get a new array each row reversed.

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.array([
...     [0, 1, 2, 3],
...     [4, 5, 6, 7],
...     [8, 9, 10, 11]
... ])
>>> a[:, ::-1]
array([[ 3,  2,  1,  0],
       [ 7,  6,  5,  4],
       [11, 10,  9,  8]])
>>> a[:, ::-1].diagonal(1)
array([2, 5, 8])

or using numpy.fliplr:

>>> np.fliplr(a).diagonal(1)
array([2, 5, 8])
share|improve this answer
1  
Note for the general case this requires calculating the offset from the other side of the array, e.g. you will need to use a.shape in your calculations –  wim Nov 23 '13 at 16:34
    
@wim, You're right. Your answer is more elegant in regard to this matter. Thank you for comment. +1 –  falsetru Nov 23 '13 at 16:39
    
In my program, I dont get to know the "1" inside the diagonal function? How do I get that? –  Ahmed Nassar Nov 23 '13 at 16:43
    
@AhmedNassar, You can use max(a.shape[1]-a.shape[0], 0) instead of 1. –  falsetru Nov 23 '13 at 16:47
    
Sorry, I'm confused how can I use this. i might've not been clear, let's say I want to get [3,6,9] what operation should I take to get it straight away, without looking at the table. –  Ahmed Nassar Nov 23 '13 at 17:20

Another way to achieve this is to use np.rot90

import numpy as np

a = np.array([[0,  1,  2,  3],
              [4,  5,  6,  7],
              [8,  9, 10,  11]])            

my_diag = np.rot90(a).diagonal(-1)

Result:

>>> my_diag
array([2, 5, 8])
share|improve this answer

A number of answers so far. @Akavall is closest as you need to rotate or filip and transpose (equivilant operations). I haven't seen a response from the OP regarding expected behavior on the "long" part of the rectangle.

Generalized solution for a square matrix:

a = array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4],
           [ 5,  6,  7,  8,  9],
           [10, 11, 12, 13, 14],
           [15, 16, 17, 18, 19],
           [20, 21, 22, 23, 24]])
>>> [(i, np.rot90(a).diagonal(2*i-a.shape[0]+1)) for i in range(a.shape[0])]
[(0, array([0])),
 (1, array([ 2,  6, 10])),
 (2, array([ 4,  8, 12, 16, 20])),
 (3, array([14, 18, 22])),
 (4, array([24]))]

As a function:

def reverse_diag(arr, n):
    idx = 2*n - arr.shape[0]+1
    return np.rot90(arr).diagonal(idx)

original matrix can be made square with a[:np.min(a.shape),:np.min(a.shape)]

EDIT: OP indicated the array is square.... Final Answer is the above

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.