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I am new to Prolog and I am having a little bit of trouble understanding recursion. I am trying to write a relation that finds the intersection of two sorted lists without using SWI's built-in intersect. I've used trace to see what's happening, and it's behaving as I expect up until the point where I want it to terminate and return the new list that contains the intersection. This makes me think that my base case is wrong. I've played around with several different ways of forming the base case, but it hasn't been fruitful. I've been using the lists [1, 2, 3, 4] and [2, 4, 6] as test cases with the following relations (the base case on top is just one I threw in as a placeholder... it doesn't work at all):

intersectS([], [], []).
intersectS([A | B], [C | D], Z) :- A < C, intersectS(B, [C | D], Z).
intersectS([A | B], [C | D], Z) :- A > C, intersectS([A | B], D, Z).
intersectS([A | B], [C | D], Z) :- A = C, append(Z, [A], Y), intersectS(B, D, Y). 

Any help is appreciated. I've seen examples where the cut (!) operator is used alongside the member/non-member, but I'm supposed to take advantage of the fact that the lists are sorted so I thought I would try this approach. Thanks in advance.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Overall, the solution you have is partway there (as you observed). There are two areas that need fixing I think. One is, as you pointed out, the "base case". I would do it as follows:

intersectS([], _, []).
intersectS(_, [], []).

In other words, anything intersected with an empty list is empty.

The second trouble spot is the clause for A = C. You have:

intersectS([A | B], [C | D], Z) :- A = C, append(Z, [A], Y), intersectS(B, D, Y).

Which says that if the heads of the two lists match, then the intersection (Z) appended with [A] (the matching head) is the intersection of the tails of the two lists. This doesn't seem correct. I think you want to say that the intersection (Z) is the intersection of the tails B and D appended to [A], which looks like this:

intersectS([A | B], [C | D], Z) :- A = C, append([A], Y, Z), intersectS(B, D, Y).

So the whole thing looks like:

intersectS([], _, []).
intersectS(_, [], []).
intersectS([A | B], [C | D], Z) :- A < C, intersectS(B, [C | D], Z).
intersectS([A | B], [C | D], Z) :- A > C, intersectS([A | B], D, Z).
intersectS([A | B], [C | D], Z) :- A = C, append([A], Y, Z), intersectS(B, D, Y).

You can take it a step further and get rid of the append since you're just dealing with one element. append([A], Y, Z) is the same as saying Z = [A|Y]. So you can replace the last clause with simply:

intersectS([A | B], [C | D], [A | Y]) :- A = C, intersectS(B, D, Y).

Running your test case:

?-  intersectS([1, 2, 3, 4], [2,4,6], L).
L = [2, 4] ;
false.

?-
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Ah, I tried adding facts like intersectS(D, [], Z) and intersectS([], D, Z), but I completely forgot about the underscore option. And I see my mistake in the logic now, thank you so much! –  Jsh Nov 23 '13 at 22:10
    
As a side note, why does this relation still return false? Is the correctness of the value of Z not provable? –  Jsh Nov 23 '13 at 22:12
    
@Jsh It returns false because after prompting with one solution and you ask for more with the ;, it means there are no more solutions. So the `false response does not apply to the found solution, but to the fact that there are no additional solutions. –  lurker Nov 23 '13 at 23:11

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