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I am using RXTX to communicate between JAVA and a microcontroller.

This is the JAVA code for opening a connection, sending and receiving data

package app;

import gnu.io.CommPort;
import gnu.io.CommPortIdentifier;
import gnu.io.SerialPort;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.OutputStream;

public class SerialCommunication1 {
    private static SerialCommunication1 instance = null;
    private static boolean coonected = false;

    public static SerialCommunication1 getInstance(){
        if(instance == null)
            instance = new SerialCommunication1();
        return instance;
    }

    private SerialCommunication1() {
        super();
        try {
            connect("COM4");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        SerialCommunication1.coonected = true;
    }

    void connect(String portName) throws Exception {
        CommPortIdentifier portIdentifier = CommPortIdentifier
                .getPortIdentifier(portName);
        if (portIdentifier.isCurrentlyOwned()) {
            System.out.println("Error: Port is currently in use");
        } else {
            CommPort commPort = portIdentifier.open(this.getClass().getName(),
                    2000);

            if (commPort instanceof SerialPort) {
                SerialPort serialPort = (SerialPort) commPort;
                serialPort.setSerialPortParams(9600, SerialPort.DATABITS_8,
                        SerialPort.STOPBITS_2, SerialPort.PARITY_NONE);

                InputStream in = serialPort.getInputStream();
                OutputStream out = serialPort.getOutputStream();

                (new Thread(new SerialReader(in))).start();
                (new Thread(new SerialWriter(out))).start();

            } else {
                System.out
                        .println("Error: Only serial ports are handled by this example.");
            }
        }
    }

    /** */
    public static class SerialReader implements Runnable {
        InputStream in;

        public SerialReader(InputStream in) {
            this.in = in;
        }

        public void run() {
            byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
            int len = -1;
            try {
                while ((len = this.in.read(buffer)) > -1) {
                    System.out.print(new String(buffer, 0, len));
                }
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    /** */
    public static class SerialWriter implements Runnable {
        OutputStream out;
        static String str = null;

        public SerialWriter(OutputStream out) {
            this.out = out;
        }

        public void run() {
            System.out.println("Will try to execute");
            try {
                if(str.length() > 0){
                    this.out.write(str.getBytes());
                    str = null;
                }
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

}

And this is the Java code that is calling when an event triggers

SerialCommunication1.getInstance();
if(ledStatus == true) {SerialCommunication1.SerialWriter.str = "4A01";}
else {SerialCommunication1.SerialWriter.str = "4A00";}
stopProcess();

And now the problem. I need to send a command to my microcontroller with the code 4A01 and, after receiving the answer, I need to call it again with the code 4A00. The calls are triggered by a button from my Java interface. The problem is that the second call is not executed (4A00 is not sending). I tried to inverse the command codes and they work well. After the first one (4A01) is executed, my microcontroller reacts and sends the response which is read by java and my interface is updated. When I send the invers command (4A00) it stops exactly at this line SerialCommunication1.SerialWriter.str = "4A00"; and doesn't even enter inside the SerialWriter's run() method.

Do you have any idea why is this happening? From the side of my microcontroller there is no problem, I checked all the possibilities with a tool.

I hope I made myself clear.

Thank you!

LE: I forgot to tel you that it didn't throw any errors or exceptions

share|improve this question
    
Did you have a chance to take a look to the answers? Are these helpful? –  dic19 Dec 5 '13 at 2:27

2 Answers 2

I'm not sure because I'm not able to test your code but I think your problem is in SerialWriter class:

public static class SerialWriter implements Runnable {
    OutputStream out;
    static String str = null; // Here str is initialized to null

    public SerialWriter(OutputStream out) {
        this.out = out;
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Will try to execute");
        try {
            if(str.length() > 0) { // this should throw NPE because str is null
                this.out.write(str.getBytes());
                str = null;
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Since there is no loop in this method, then the thread created within SerialCommunication1 at this line:

(new Thread(new SerialWriter(out))).start();

most likely finishes its execution after sending the first str.

Honestly I don't understand how does it even send a single string, since str is initialized to null in first place and it should throw NullPointerException at str.length() line.

I would suggest you this approach:

  • Don't trigger a writer thread when connection is established, just trigger a new one every time a message will be sent.
  • Use Singleton pattern correctly.
  • Keep a reference to the serial port in SerialCommunication1 class.

Translated to code it would be something like this:

class SerialWriter implements Runnable {
    OutputStream out;
    String message;

    public SerialWriter(OutputStream out) {
        this.out = out;
    }

    public void setMessage(String msg) {
        this.message = msg;
    }

    public void run() {
        try {
            if(message != null) {
                this.out.write(str.getBytes());
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Then in SerialCommunication1 class add this public method:

public void sendMessage(String msg) {
    SerialWriter writer = new SerialWriter(serialPort.getOutputStream()); // of course you'll have to keep reference to serialPort when connection is established
    writer.setMessage(msg);
    (new Thread(writer)).start();
}

And finally call this method in this way:

SerialCommunication1.getInstance().sendMessage("4A01");
share|improve this answer

tzortzik,

I think tha is a timeout problem. Try to addding a delay to writer :

/** */
public static class SerialWriter implements Runnable {
    OutputStream out;
    static String str = null;

    public SerialWriter(OutputStream out) {
        this.out = out;
    }

    public void run() {
        Thread.sleep(500); //<-----------  this should be in mainThread before to SerialWriter.start();
        System.out.println("Will try to execute");
        try {
            if(str.length() > 0){
                this.out.write(str.getBytes());
                str = null;
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

It happens to me many times, "we should learn to wait for a response" (^_^)

Check if you are executing well a secuence like the next:

Send command 4A01
Receive response 4A01 from micro

WAIT FOR RESPONSE BEFORE SEND SECOND COMMAND. Thread.sleep(500); //wait for 500 milis or more

Send command 4A00
Receive response 4A00 from micro

I hope it could help you.

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