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I've got a large (by number of lines) plain text file that I'd like to split into smaller files, also by number of lines. So if my file has around 2M lines, I'd like to split it up into 10 files that contain 200k lines, or 100 files that contain 20k lines (plus one file with the remainder; being evenly divisible doesn't matter).

I could do this fairly easily in Python but I'm wondering if there's any kind of ninja way to do this using bash and unix utils (as opposed to manually looping and counting / partitioning lines).

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Out of curiousity, after they're "split", how does one "combine" them? Something like "cat part2 >> part1"? Or is there another ninja utility? mind updating your question? –  dlamotte Jan 6 '10 at 22:47
1  
To put it back together, cat part* > original –  Mark Byers Jan 6 '10 at 22:49
5  
yes cat is short for concatenate. In general apropos is useful for finding appropriate commands. I.E. see the output of: apropos split –  pixelbeat Jan 6 '10 at 22:51
    
@pixelbeat That is pretty cool, thanks –  danben Jan 6 '10 at 23:00
2  
As an aside, OS X users should make sure their file contains LINUX or UNIX-style Line breaks/End-Of-Line indicators (LF) instead of MAC OS X - style end-of-line indicators (CR) - the split and csplit commands will not work if your like breaks are Carriage Returns instead of LineFeeds. TextWrangler from BareBones software can help you with this if you're on Mac OS. You can choose how you want your line break characters look. when you save (or Save As...) your text files. –  user1763836 Oct 21 '12 at 21:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 137 down vote accepted

Have you looked at the split command?

$ split --help
Usage: split [OPTION] [INPUT [PREFIX]]
Output fixed-size pieces of INPUT to PREFIXaa, PREFIXab, ...; default
size is 1000 lines, and default PREFIX is `x'.  With no INPUT, or when INPUT
is -, read standard input.

Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.
  -a, --suffix-length=N   use suffixes of length N (default 2)
  -b, --bytes=SIZE        put SIZE bytes per output file
  -C, --line-bytes=SIZE   put at most SIZE bytes of lines per output file
  -d, --numeric-suffixes  use numeric suffixes instead of alphabetic
  -l, --lines=NUMBER      put NUMBER lines per output file
      --verbose           print a diagnostic to standard error just
                            before each output file is opened
      --help     display this help and exit
      --version  output version information and exit

You could do something like:

split -l 200000 filename
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3  
you can also split a file by size: split -b 200m filename (m for megabytes, k for kilobytes or no suffix for bytes) –  Abhi Beckert Jun 24 '11 at 7:55
24  
split by size and ensure files are split on line breaks: split -C 200m filename –  Clayton Stanley Dec 13 '12 at 2:12
1  
split produces garbled output with Unicode (UTF-16) input. At least on Windows with the version I have. –  Vertigo May 24 '13 at 7:57
    
Using split data.csv in OSX 10.8.4 to separate a 5k line file just produces an identical file named xaa.. –  geotheory Aug 16 '13 at 13:01
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@geotheory, be sure to follow LeberMac's advice earlier in the thread about first converting CR (Mac) line endings to LR (Linux) line endings using TextWrangler or BBEdit. I had the exact same problem as you until I found that piece of advice. –  sstringer Aug 25 '13 at 20:00

How about the split command?

split -l 200000 mybigfile.txt
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Yes, there is a split command. It will split a file by lines or bytes.

$ split --help
Usage: split [OPTION]... [INPUT [PREFIX]]
Output fixed-size pieces of INPUT to PREFIXaa, PREFIXab, ...; default
size is 1000 lines, and default PREFIX is `x'.  With no INPUT, or when INPUT
is -, read standard input.

Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.
  -a, --suffix-length=N   use suffixes of length N (default 2)
  -b, --bytes=SIZE        put SIZE bytes per output file
  -C, --line-bytes=SIZE   put at most SIZE bytes of lines per output file
  -d, --numeric-suffixes  use numeric suffixes instead of alphabetic
  -l, --lines=NUMBER      put NUMBER lines per output file
      --verbose           print a diagnostic just before each
                            output file is opened
      --help     display this help and exit
      --version  output version information and exit

SIZE may have a multiplier suffix:
b 512, kB 1000, K 1024, MB 1000*1000, M 1024*1024,
GB 1000*1000*1000, G 1024*1024*1024, and so on for T, P, E, Z, Y.
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Tried georgec@ATGIS25 ~ $ split -l 100000 /cygdrive/P/2012/Job_044_DM_Radio_Propogation/Working/FinalPropogation/TRC_Longl‌​ands/trc_longlands.txt but there are no split files in the directory -where is the output? –  GeorgeC Mar 8 '12 at 4:05

use split

Split a file into fixed-size pieces, creates output files containing consecutive sections of INPUT (standard input if none is given or INPUT is `-')

Syntax split [options] [INPUT [PREFIX]]

http://ss64.com/bash/split.html

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you can also use awk

awk -vc=1 'NR%200000==0{++c}{print $0 > c".txt"}' largefile
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Not bad, but not so far off from what I would have done in Python. –  danben Jan 7 '10 at 1:12
    
awk -v lines=200000 -v fmt="%d.txt" '{print>sprintf(fmt,1+int((NR-1)/lines))}' –  Mark Edgar Jan 7 '10 at 6:52

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