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I am trying to figure out how to assign a seperate stylesheet for different pages? I wan't to use the same stylesheet for my front page, and page template and a different stylesheet for my blog and it's related pages.

My theme only consists of a front page, a page template and a blog. So I would somehow need to figure out how to differentiate from the actual pages. It would need to be applied to all blog pages.

So I am wondering if I could do something like this(added to the header):

<?php if ( 'front-page.php' ) { ?>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="<?php bloginfo('stylesheet_url'); type="text/css" media="screen" />
<?php } elseif ( 'page.php' ) { ?>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="<?php bloginfo('stylesheet_url'); ?>"  type="text/css" media="screen" />
<?php } else { ?>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="<?php bloginfo('stylesheet_url'); ?>"  type="text/css" media="screen" />
 <?php } ?>

If it is front page or the page template it uses the normal stylesheet. If it is anything else, it uses the blog stylesheet. If it can be done like that, can anyone help me with the syntax?

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Why would you want that? –  user2019515 Nov 24 '13 at 2:41
    
@user2019515 Heres the thing, I am trying to add some functionality from an opensource php webapp into my theme, and the opensource app has alot classes with the same names, especially the basic defined classes like h1, h2, h3, div, blockquote. I would like to keep it looking the same. I still need to use my header and footers, so I was thinking it would be easier to add my header and footer classes into it's stylesheet and use the logic to define which stylesheet to use. –  user1632018 Nov 24 '13 at 4:12

2 Answers 2

Depending on your circumstances the best way to generally do this is all in the one CSS style sheet.

You can target specific WordPress pages in your CSS document by using page-id selectors like:

.page-id-156 h1 { color: red; }

Or you can target by page template

.page-template-blog div { border: 1px solid black; }

These classes are automatically attached to the body element when using the body_class() function in your header.php like so

<body <?php body_class(); ?>

There's more info about that function here http://codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/body_class

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Heres the thing, I am trying to add some functionality from an opensource php webapp into my theme, and the opensource app has alot classes with the same names, especially the basic defined classes like h1, h2, h3, div, blockquote. I would like to keep it looking the same. I still need to use my header and footers, so I was thinking it would be easier to add my header and footer classes into it's stylesheet and use the logic to define which stylesheet to use. –  user1632018 Nov 24 '13 at 4:11
    
You could really use any of the methods answered here, if the CSS from the web app is small you could copy it into your style sheet and add the page-id-XX class infront of all of them. If you have a lot of CSS from the web app you could use @b's answer below and use the is_page() function to load the web app style sheet on that page only codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/is_page If you get a lot of CSS clashes from this then a method like you described might actually be the best solution, especially if you only have 3 pages. Hope this helped! –  jsrgnt Nov 24 '13 at 4:23

jsrgnt answer is pretty much spot on. But case you need to use different stylesheets, use wp_enqueue_scripts on your functions.php:

add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'enqueue_so_20169099' );

function enqueue_so_20169099()
{
    # http://codex.wordpress.org/Conditional_Tags
    if( is_something() )
    {
        wp_enqueue_script( /* etc */ );
    }
}
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