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How can I stop using the goto here:

if(true)
{
    goto ln1;
}
DialogResult b=DialogResult.Yes;
while(b==DialogResult.Yes){
    //Stuff
    ln1: Function();  
}

Because using a goto from one scope to another is clearly not allowed.(It gives an error). So what can I do instead? I need to get to the SECOND line of code, not first.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Henk Holterman, Benjamin Gruenbaum, legoscia, JDB, PSL Nov 24 '13 at 5:23

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Why are you using the goto here in the first place? It seems to be doing the same thing without it. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Nov 23 '13 at 23:22
3  
You should never, ever, ever, ever, ever (except in some niche situation) need to use goto in code. Certainly, your example should be refactorable to work without goto. goto can be a bit of a pain to debug - trust me, I've been there many times during my QuickBasic days. –  Jason Evans Nov 23 '13 at 23:28
    
I wasn't aware C# still has goto in its syntax –  Yuriy Galanter Nov 23 '13 at 23:53
    
This makes no sense since there is no link between Function() and b. –  Henk Holterman Nov 23 '13 at 23:54
    
Also, always post the exact error message. –  Henk Holterman Nov 23 '13 at 23:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to enter the loop without an initial check of the condition, use a do ... while loop.

Example:

DialogResult b;
do {
   b = ShowDialog(myYesNoDialog);
} while(b == DialogResult.Yes);

If you want to use the initial check or not depending on a condition, use a boolean variable:

bool skipCondition = (some condition);
DialogResult b = DialogResult.Yes;
while (skipCondition || b == DialogResult.Yes) {
   skipCondition = false;
   b = ShowDialog(myYesNoDialog);
}
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1  
@EdwardKarak: If you want to enter the loop without the initial check, then you don't need anything instead of goto, the do ... while loop does exactly that. If you want to use the initial check or not depending on a condition, I added an alternative for that above. –  Guffa Nov 23 '13 at 23:58

Do not use goto label; goto makes your code very complicated! I think you have to rethink in your classes design and your function workflow.
Very helpful link: 'Goto' is this bad?

var runFlag = false;
   if (true)
   {
       runFlag = true;
   }
   DialogResult b = DialogResult.Yes;
   while (b == DialogResult.Yes || runFlag) 
   {
     Function(); 
   }
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1  
Goto has nothing to break "OOP rules" - goto is a flow control construct. OOP is a coding paradigm. The two are really unrelated. The reason to avoid goto is because it's confusing to read code with goto. See cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/ewd02xx/EWD215.PDF –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Nov 23 '13 at 23:36
    
Well, sometimes it seems, goto is more readable than break. –  JeffRSon Nov 23 '13 at 23:38
    
@User3805967 the paper I linked you to IS Dijkstra's paper (maybe you should consider reading it?). OOP talks about objects, their interactions and how program communication should happen. goto is a flow control construct, it's a part of the syntax, and has nothing to do with good or bad OOP. Claiming it does indicates lack of basic understanding of what a coding paradigm is, and what language syntax is (and how the two are connected in this case). Consider revising your answer to make sense. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Nov 23 '13 at 23:47
    
Maybe then my English description was really confusing. because we are agree with your last words. –  Bassam Alugili Nov 23 '13 at 23:51
1  
^^ done thanks for the correction! –  Bassam Alugili Nov 23 '13 at 23:55

It seems to be something like that:

DialogResult b=...; // must be initialized - it's not correct to skip that

if(true)
{
    // goto ln1;
} else {
    b=DialogResult.Yes;
}
do
{
  /*ln1:*/ Function();
}
while(b==DialogResult.Yes); 
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You do realise that your code skips a lot of lines so the program won't actually compile let lone run? What you have written is the same as

    do
{
    Function();
}while(b==DialogResult.Yes)

To make it work you'd need to execute

DialogResult b = DialogResult.Yes;

first

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