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I've been messing around with a Chrome extension to handle inserting/replace hrefs to files with an alternative call to a download server on my network to perform the download on your behave. The challenge I'm having is it doesn't appear as if I can define a content script Javascript function that I can assign all onclick events to.

manifest.json

 {
  "name": "Test",
  "version": "0",
  "background": {
      "scripts": ["background.js"]
  },
  "manifest_version": 2,
  "browser_action": {
    "default_title": "Status",
    "default_popup": "status.html",
    "icons": ["icon.png"],
    "default_icon": "icon.png"
  },
  "content_scripts": [ {
    "js": [ "jquery.js", "content.js" ],
    "css": ["customStyles.css"],
    "matches": [ "http://*"]
  }],
  "permissions": [
      "http://192.168.1.28/"
  ]
}

A sample content.js I've been messing with:

$('.rRow1,.rRow2 .subject').find('a:first').each(function() {
    $(this).after("&nbsp;<a class='headerlink' href='#' onclick='queue(this);'>[Queue]</a>");
});

var queue = "http://192.168.1.28:8081/adddownload.req?URL=";
function queue(le) {
    var link = $(le).attr('href');
    alert("Queuing: " + link);
    $.ajax({
          type: 'GET',
          url: queue,
          dataType: 'html',
          success: function(data) {
              try {
                console.log(data);
              } catch(e) {
                alert("Error: " + e.message);
                return;
              }
          }
    });
}

My queued function throws an "Uncaught ReferenceError: queue is not defined" in the Chrome console. Now I get that content script operates in an "isolated world", and I now know why queued is undefined.

What I'm a little lost on is a way to implement the desired function. Should I handle the ajax call in background, and post a message from the content script? I also tried addEventListener on each new inserted element without luck.

Update Ok, here's what I came up with. It's functional but I really don't like attaching a new copy of the Ajax code to each element. If I had a way of referencing a single function that did the job, it would be more efficient. Any suggestions?

$('.rRow1,.rRow2 .subject').find('a:first').each(function() {
    $(this).after("&nbsp;<a class='dlqueue' href='#'>[Queue]</a>");
    var link = $(this).attr('href');
    $(this).next().click(function() {
        $.ajax({
              type: 'GET',
              url: "http://192.168.1.28:8081/adddownload.req?URL="+encodeURIComponent(link),
              dataType: 'html',
              success: function(data) {
                console.log("Download queued.");
              }
        });
    });
});

Is this is best way to be doing something like this? Thanks!

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1  
You can define any functions and vars you want in content.js and they will be accessible with content.js as expected. It looks like you were running into issues because you defined the url var and the function with the same name. –  abraham Nov 24 '13 at 9:00
    
Holy hell. That was it. You know I pulled this function from my popup.js where I named the var something different, and didn't think twice about renaming it here. I was fiddling with this late last night... Thanks! –  garlicman Nov 24 '13 at 17:04
    
Couldn't re-edit my reply, but that was a problem but not the problem. You can attach functions in a content script to elements in the DOM, but not call functions in a content script from the DOM, which is what I was doing in my first example. –  garlicman Nov 24 '13 at 17:24
    
ah yes, in general you should avoid inline javascript like the onclick attribute. –  abraham Nov 24 '13 at 17:49

1 Answer 1

Ok, answering this one myself. Thanks for abraham for pointing out a variable and the function name were the same. It was a problem but not the real problem.

The DOM can't call a function defined in a content script. A content script can assign a function to the DOM, but it'll then exist in the DOM, not in the content script. For example:

$(this).after("&nbsp;<a class='headerlink' href='#' onclick='queue(this);'>[Queue]</a>");

This is a DOM element and the onclick is calling a function that only exists in the content script but it inaccessible from the DOM. Instead I needed to assign the function to the DOM object in the content script. Here's the updated, working sample:

$('.rRow1,.rRow2 .subject').find('a:first').each(function() {
    //$(this).after("&nbsp;<a class='dlqueue' href='#' onclick='queue(this);'>[Queue]</a>");
    var el = this;
    $(el).after("&nbsp;<a class='test' href='#'>[Queue]</a>");
    $(el).next().click(function() {
        queue(el);
    });
});

var endpoint = "http://192.168.1.28:8081/adddownload.req?URL=";
var username = "test";
var password = "test";
function queue(el) {
    var link = $(el).attr('href');
    $.ajax({
          type: 'GET',
          url: endpoint+link,
          dataType: 'html',
          username: username,
          password: password,
          success: function(data) {
            console.log("Download queued.");
          }
    });
}
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