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I have an SQL Server DB with a table with these fields:

  1. A bit with the default value 1, NOT NULL.
  2. A smalldatetime with the default value gettime(), NOT NULL.
  3. An int with no default value, IDENTITY, NOT NULL.

When I generate Linq to SQL for this table, the following happens:

  1. The bit is given no special treatment.
  2. The smalldatetime is given no special treatment.
  3. The int is marked as IsDbGenerated.

This means that when I make inserts using Linq to SQL, the following will happen:

  1. The bit will be sent as 0, overriding the default value. Right?
  2. The smalldatetime will be sent as an uninitialized System.DateTime, producing an error in SQL server since it doesn't fall with the SQL Server smalldatetime range. Right?
  3. The IsDbGenerated int will not be sent; the DB will generate a value which Linq to SQL will then read back.

What changes do I have to make to make this scenario work?

To summarize: I want non-nullable fields with DB-assigned default values, but I don't want them IsDbGenerated if it means I cannot provide values for them when making updates or inserts using Linq to SQL. I also do not want them IsDbGenerated if it means I have to hand-modify the code generated by Linq to SQL.

EDIT: The answer seems to be this is a limitation in the current Linq to SQL.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Linq-To-Sql generated classes do not pick up the Default Value Constriants.

Maybe in the future, but the issue is constraints aren't always simple values, they can also be scalar functions like GetDate(), so linq would somehow have to know how to translate those. In short, it doesn't even try. It's also a very database-specific type of thing.

  • You could write a code generator to create entity partial classes where you can extract the default value constriant.
  • Alternatively your business layer code could set the defaults in constructors from an xml file, and all you need to do is keep the xml file up-to-date.
  • Instead of doing the work in constructors, you could emulate sql and add default values by inspecting the ChangeSet before submitting changes to the database.

The issue you are having is described at length in CodeProject - Setting Default Values for LINQ Bound Data

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"linq would somehow have to know how to translate those" - why? It could just allow passing nothing on create/update, and read them back afterwards. That's how IsDbGenerated fields work, except for their read-only status on the Linq side. –  bzlm Oct 19 '08 at 17:14
    
Sure, it could allow it, but it doesn't. IsDbGenerated is only for key columns at this point in time. The "linq would somehow ..." is just my opinion as to why this may be the case. –  Robert Paulson Oct 19 '08 at 20:31
    
seems that IsDbGenerated is now available for non key columns as well. –  Make it useful Keep it simple Nov 21 '11 at 0:35

I've run into the same problem, bzlm, and come to the same conclusion. There's simply no good way to get non-nullable fields with DB-assigned default values working with Linq To Sql.

The work around I've gone with is to add a SetDefaults() method very similar to the one Robert Paulson linked to on CodeProject and call it in the default constructor of my table entity base class. It works well for me, because 95% of the time, I'm setting a 0, empty string, or getdate().

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Yeah, same here. Thanks! –  bzlm Oct 19 '08 at 17:13

This means that when I make inserts using Linq to SQL, the following will happen:

  1. The bit will be sent as 0, overriding the default value. Right? - Correct
  2. The smalldatetime will be sent as an uninitialized System.DateTime, producing an error in SQL server since it doesn't fall with the SQL Server smalldatetime range. Right? - What is sent is DateTime.MinValue
  3. The IsDbGenerated int will not be sent; the DB will generate a value which Linq to SQL will then read back. - If DB generated is set then the value is created by the database, if not then Linq expects the user to set the value.

Your best bet is to set them in the constructor of the object, or on the private fields, if you are not using automatic properties.

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It sounds like you are saying that default values on fields in SQL Server values are NOT possible to combine with Linq To SQL. Is this correct? –  bzlm Oct 14 '08 at 19:00
    
It is possible but you can't change them after the fact. If you want to be able to change them then you should create them in the constructor. –  David Basarab Oct 14 '08 at 19:31
    
Sorry, I don't understand. What is possible? And what can't be changed after what fact? Is it possible to make Linq To SQL perform an insert and have the "default values" specified in the DB used? –  bzlm Oct 14 '08 at 19:47
    
Don't use the constructor, there is a special partial method called OnCreate for this. See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/82409/… –  Sam Oct 20 '08 at 10:16
    
Actually, it's OnCreated. Longhorn213's answers are very confusing, and he/she has also edited my original question for seemingly no reason. Just ignore him/her. –  bzlm Oct 22 '08 at 21:45

You can create another file for your datacontext (partial class) and then use the InsertYOURENTITY and UpdateYOURENTITY partial methods to inspect your properties and assign the proper values. Call ExecuteDynamicInsert or ExecuteDynamicUpdate after your code and you're set.

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Actually, the recommended way to do this in the BLL is to implement the partial method OnCreated() for the entity, not the method you suggest. Still, it's not relevant to my question. My question is about default values in SQL Server, not in the BLL. –  bzlm Oct 15 '08 at 21:57

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