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I have a simple code, like:

sockaddr_un address;
address.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
strcpy(address.sun_path, path);
unlink(path);

int fd = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
bind(fd, (sockaddr*)(&address), sizeof(address));
listen(fd, 100);

I want to atomically create the Unix Domain Socket file with a specific permissions, say: 0777. The manual doesn't say anything about socket file permissions with regard to umask or whatever. Even, if the umask does affect the socket file, then it's not an atomic way - in multi-threaded program.

I hope, there is a way to achieve my goal without using synchronization of umask() calls.

share|improve this question
    
Why care? Setting permissions after the fact has never caused an issue for me. It's not like there are processes sitting there waiting to pounce illegitimately on your socket -- and if there are, you have far bigger problems than socket permissions. –  cHao Nov 24 '13 at 6:34
    
You do not need to worry so much about atomically setting permissions. If there's a rogue process trying that hard to access the socket, that they could get to it between the microsecond you create it and the microsecond you set permissions on it, then your machine is compromised, and you should be fixing that rather than trying to work around it. –  cHao Nov 24 '13 at 6:43
1  
@cHao: There may be the processes that are listening inotify and may try to connect to the socket before my process has set right permissions - it's a "good" process, but it will fail. My question is more the theoretical question, that an attemp to find workaround for some specific situation. –  abyss.7 Nov 24 '13 at 6:44
    
Well, the umask bind method, if it worked, could be made thread-safe, you would only need to fork and then umask bind and then pass the FD for the opened socket back to the parent. –  Dan D. Nov 24 '13 at 7:16
    
@DanD.: .. or protect access to the umask();bind();umask() triple using a mutex. –  alk Nov 24 '13 at 15:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Another solution is to create a directory with the desired permissions, and then create the socket inside it (example code without any regard for error checking and buffer overflows):

// Create a directory with the proper permissions
mkdir(path, 077);
// Append the name of the socket
strcat(path, "/socket_name");

// Create the socket normally
sockaddr_un address;
address.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
strcpy(address.sun_path, path);
int fd = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
bind(fd, (sockaddr*)(&address), sizeof(address));
listen(fd, 100);
share|improve this answer
    
It's the best proposed solution, since the ownership of a parent directory of the unix-socket affects its connect-ability. –  abyss.7 Nov 17 '14 at 7:07

Forking, using umask and passing back the fd is the only portable way I can think of. Having a directory for the socket is better in any case, for example nobody can delete the socket if the directory doesn't ahve the proper permissions, and creating diretcories can be done atomically.

The bigger problem is that relying on permissions is not portable - many BSD-derived socket stacks simply ignore the permissions of enclosing directories and/or the socket itself.

On GNU/Linux systems, you cna do it by calling fchmod on the socket fd after socket() and before bind()

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1  
Exactly, fchmod() before bind() works without races in a multi-threaded environments, but is not portable to, let's say, some BSD variants. Even POSIX says that fchmod() on socket has unspecified behaviour. You definitely *should care about the permissions being set atomically. –  nert Jul 22 '14 at 9:30
    
What does "forking and passing the fd back" mean? –  Guido Nov 11 '14 at 0:00
    
@Guido You can pass file descriptors through a socket. See normalesup.org/~george/comp/libancillary –  dataless Nov 17 '14 at 6:30
    
@Anonymous Can't you just create the socket, fork, umask, bind, and then return 0 to tell the parent the socket is ready? Easier than ancillary data... And do you know for sure which BSDs ignore permissions? Best info I can find is that 4.2 ignored socket perms, but checked dir perms. –  dataless Nov 17 '14 at 6:32
    
@dataless, That's amazing. Thank you! –  Guido Dec 15 '14 at 3:49

I had the best luck using chmod() (NOT fchmod) using the file name for the unix domain socket after calling socket(), bind(), but, before calling listen().

  int return_value;
  const char *sock_path;
  struct sockaddr_un local;

  sock_path = "/tmp/mysocket";

  sockfd = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
  if (sockfd == -1)
  {
    perror("socket");
    exit(-1);
  }

  local.sun_family = AF_UNIX; 
  strcpy(local.sun_path, sock_path);
  unlink(local.sun_path);
  len = strlen(local.sun_path) + sizeof(local.sun_family);
  bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&local, len);

  chmod(sock_path, 0777);

  retval = listen(sockfd, BACKLOG);
  if (retval == -1)
  {
    perror("listen");
    exit(-1);
  }

. . . . .

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work, if some process monitors the socket via inotify - as I mentioned in a comment to my question. –  abyss.7 Jul 3 '14 at 6:42
1  
@abyss.7 Actually I just tested (Linux 3.8.0) and it does work. connect() will fail on a socket if listen() has not been called yet. So, it would seem you can safely chmod a socket before calling listen() without worry that an un-authorized user will connect. However, as Elias mentioned, it is best to create a directory with the desired permissions and the socket within the directory. –  dataless Nov 17 '14 at 6:48

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