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How do I concatenate two std::vectors?

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vector1.insert( vector1.end(), vector2.begin(), vector2.end() );
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30  
I'd only add code to first get the number of elements each vector holds, and set vector1 to be the one holding the greatest. Should you do otherwise you're doing a lot of unnecessary copying. – Joe Pineda Oct 14 '08 at 16:11
13  
I have a question. Will this work if vector1 and vector2 are the same vectors? – Alexander Rafferty Jul 17 '11 at 9:36
2  
If you have concatenating several vectors to one, is it helpful to call reserve on the destination vector first? – Faheem Mitha Feb 4 '12 at 23:07
13  
@AlexanderRafferty: Only if vector1.capacity() >= 2 * vector1.size(). Which is atypical unless you've called std::vector::reserve(). Otherwise the vector will reallocate, invalidating the iterators passed as parameters 2 and 3. – Drew Dormann Jun 21 '12 at 20:30
2  
@Aidin The arguments of insert are not vectors, they're input iterators. They could be used to determine the size of the inserted range, but AFAIK the GNU implementation of the STL doesn't, it just does a loop calling insert on each element. So if vector2 is much bigger, it could do several reallocations. – Khaur Jan 22 '15 at 12:58

I would use the insert function Something like:

vector<int> a, b;
//fill with data
b.insert(b.end(), a.begin(), a.end());
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Change a.front() to a.begin(). – smink Oct 14 '08 at 15:52
6  
thanks, this works. note to stl: you are too verbose! – Jon Galloway Oct 14 '08 at 15:52
4  
This isn't verbose. – Miles Rout Apr 27 '14 at 4:37
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@MilesRout It's verbose. a + b isn't. – evertheylen Dec 7 '15 at 19:45
2  
You aren't adding them, why would you use +? You're concatenating them by modifying one of them. – Miles Rout Dec 8 '15 at 20:24

Or you could use:

std::copy(source.begin(), source.end(), std::back_inserter(destination));

This pattern is useful if the two vectors don't contain exactly the same type of thing, because you can use something instead of std::back_inserter to convert from one type to the other.

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4  
the copy method is a not such a good way. It will call push_back multiple time which means that if a lot of elements have to be inserted this could mean multiple reallocations. it is better to use insert as the vector implementation could do some optimization to avoid reallocations. it could reserve memory before starting copying – Yogesh Arora Mar 22 '10 at 13:16
4  
@Yogesh: granted, but there's nothing stopping you calling reserve first. The reason std::copy is sometimes useful is if you want to use something other than back_inserter. – Roger Lipscombe Mar 22 '10 at 18:36
    
totally agree with that. – Yogesh Arora Mar 22 '10 at 18:55
    
When you say "multiple allocations", that is true - but the number of allocations is at worst log(number of entries added) - which means that the cost of adding an entry is constant in the number of entries added. (Basically, don't worry about it unless profiling shows you need a reserve). – Martin Bonner Nov 20 '15 at 13:55
    
You might want to use std::transform to do this instead. – Martin Broadhurst 2 days ago

If you are using C++11, and wish to move the elements rather than merely copying them, you can use std::move_iterator (http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/iterator/move_iterator) along with insert (or copy):

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  std::vector<int> dest{1,2,3,4,5};
  std::vector<int> src{6,7,8,9,10};

  // Move elements from src to dest.
  // src is left in undefined but safe-to-destruct state.
  dest.insert(
      dest.end(),
      std::make_move_iterator(src.begin()),
      std::make_move_iterator(src.end())
    );

  // Print out concatenated vector.
  std::copy(
      dest.begin(),
      dest.end(),
      std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n")
    );

  return 0;
}

This will not be more efficient for the example with ints, since moving them is no more efficient than copying them, but for a data structure with optimized moves, it can avoid copying unnecessary state:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  std::vector<std::vector<int>> dest{{1,2,3,4,5}, {3,4}};
  std::vector<std::vector<int>> src{{6,7,8,9,10}};

  // Move elements from src to dest.
  // src is left in undefined but safe-to-destruct state.
  dest.insert(
      dest.end(),
      std::make_move_iterator(src.begin()),
      std::make_move_iterator(src.end())
    );

  return 0;
}

After the move, src's element is left in an undefined but safe-to-destruct state, and its former elements were transfered directly to dest's new element at the end.

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The std::make_move_iterator() method helped me when trying to concatenate std::vectors of std::unique_ptr. – Knitschi Dec 27 '14 at 13:43
std::vector<int> first;
std::vector<int> second;

first.insert(first.end(), second.begin(), second.end());
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With C++11, I'd prefer following to append vector b to a:

std::move(b.begin(), b.end(), std::back_inserter(a));
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1  
Undefined behaviour if a actually is b (which is OK if you know that can never happen - but worth being aware of in general purpose code). – Martin Bonner Nov 20 '15 at 13:53
    
@MartinBonner Thanks for mentioning that. Probably I should turn back to the old insert way which is safer. – Deqing Feb 1 at 3:31

If you are interested in strong exception guarantee (when copy constructor can throw an exception):

template<typename T>
inline void append_copy(std::vector<T>& v1, const std::vector<T>& v2)
{
    const auto orig_v1_size = v1.size();
    v1.reserve(orig_v1_size + v2.size());
    try
    {
        v1.insert(v1.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end());
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        v1.erase(v1.begin() + orig_v1_size, v1.end());
        throw;
    }
}

Similar append_move with strong guarantee can't be implemented in general if vector element's move constructor can throw (which is unlikely but still).

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Is it not possible for v1.erase(... to throw too? – camelCase Oct 12 '15 at 15:33

Let's say you have vectors v1 and v2

for(v2::iterator i = v2.begin(); i != v2.end(); i++) {
    v1.push_back(i);
}

.. with necessary corrections ..
would be simple enough and not indulging in verbose and tall lines.

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Add this one to your header file:

template <typename T> vector<T> concat(vector<T> &a, vector<T> &b) {
    vector<T> ret = vector<T>();
    copy(a.begin(), a.end(), back_inserter(ret));
    copy(b.begin(), b.end(), back_inserter(ret));
    return ret;
}

and use it this way:

vector<int> a = vector<int>();
vector<int> b = vector<int>();

a.push_back(1);
a.push_back(2);
b.push_back(62);

vector<int> r = concat(a, b);

r will contain [1,2,62]

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