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How do I concatenate two STL Vectors?

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6 Answers 6

vector1.insert( vector1.end(), vector2.begin(), vector2.end() );
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20  
I'd only add code to first get the number of elements each vector holds, and set vector1 to be the one holding the greatest. Should you do otherwise you're doing a lot of unnecessary copying. –  Joe Pineda Oct 14 '08 at 16:11
6  
I have a question. Will this work if vector1 and vector2 are the same vectors? –  Alexander Rafferty Jul 17 '11 at 9:36
2  
If you have concatenating several vectors to one, is it helpful to call reserve on the destination vector first? –  Faheem Mitha Feb 4 '12 at 23:07
7  
@AlexanderRafferty: Only if vector1.capacity() >= 2 * vector1.size(). Which is atypical unless you've called std::vector::reserve(). Otherwise the vector will reallocate, invalidating the iterators passed as parameters 2 and 3. –  Drew Dormann Jun 21 '12 at 20:30
    
@FaheemMitha: Since arguments of insert are vectors, it's already know how many elements are ahead and will handle it itself. If we were inserting other things like array, it was useful to reserve the space first. –  Aidin Apr 14 at 1:35
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I would use the insert function Something like:

vector<int> a, b;
//fill with data
b.insert(b.end(), a.begin(), a.end());
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Change a.front() to a.begin(). –  smink Oct 14 '08 at 15:52
2  
thanks, this works. note to stl: you are too verbose! –  Jon Galloway Oct 14 '08 at 15:52
    
This isn't verbose. –  Miles Rout Apr 27 at 4:37
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Or you could use:

std::copy(source.begin(), source.end(), std::back_inserter(destination));

This pattern is useful if the two vectors don't contain exactly the same type of thing, because you can use something instead of std::back_inserter to convert from one type to the other.

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the copy method is a not such a good way. It will call push_back multiple time which means that if a lot of elements have to be inserted this could mean multiple reallocations. it is better to use insert as the vector implementation could do some optimization to avoid reallocations. it could reserve memory before starting copying –  Yogesh Arora Mar 22 '10 at 13:16
2  
@Yogesh: granted, but there's nothing stopping you calling reserve first. The reason std::copy is sometimes useful is if you want to use something other than back_inserter. –  Roger Lipscombe Mar 22 '10 at 18:36
    
totally agree with that. –  Yogesh Arora Mar 22 '10 at 18:55
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std::vector<int> first;
std::vector<int> second;

first.insert(first.end(), second.begin(), second.end());
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If you are using C++11, and wish to move the elements rather than merely copying them, you can use std::move_iterator (http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/iterator/move_iterator) along with insert (or copy):

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  std::vector<int> dest{1,2,3,4,5};
  std::vector<int> src{6,7,8,9,10};

  // Move elements from src to dest.
  // src is left in undefined but safe-to-destruct state.
  dest.insert(
      dest.end(),
      std::make_move_iterator(src.begin()),
      std::make_move_iterator(src.end())
    );

  // Print out concatenated vector.
  std::copy(
      dest.begin(),
      dest.end(),
      std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n")
    );

  return 0;
}

This will not be more efficient for the example with ints, since moving them is no more efficient than copying them, but for a data structure with optimized moves, it can avoid copying unnecessary state:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  std::vector<std::vector<int>> dest{{1,2,3,4,5}, {3,4}};
  std::vector<std::vector<int>> src{{6,7,8,9,10}};

  // Move elements from src to dest.
  // src is left in undefined but safe-to-destruct state.
  dest.insert(
      dest.end(),
      std::make_move_iterator(src.begin()),
      std::make_move_iterator(src.end())
    );

  return 0;
}

After the move, src's element is left in an undefined but safe-to-destruct state, and its former elements were transfered directly to dest's new element at the end.

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If you are interested in strong exception guarantee (when copy constructor can throw an exception):

template<typename T>
inline void append_copy(std::vector<T>& v1, const std::vector<T>& v2)
{
    const auto orig_v1_size = v1.size();
    v1.reserve(orig_v1_size + v2.size());
    try
    {
        v1.insert(v1.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end());
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        v1.erase(v1.begin() + orig_v1_size, v1.end());
        throw;
    }
}

Similar append_move with strong guarantee can't be implemented in general if vector element's move constructor can throw (which is unlikely but still).

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