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As I understood, mediator pattern are used when a group of related objects need to communicate with each other. Here is my following mediator pattern :

    public abstract class MediatorBase
    {
        public abstract void SendMessage(/*ColleaugeBase caller, */IConcreteFunction receiver, string message);
    }

    public class ConcreteMediator : MediatorBase
    {
        public override void SendMessage(/*ColleaugeBase caller, */IConcreteFunction receiver, string message)
        {
            receiver.Notify(message);
        }
    }


public interface IConcreteFunction
    {
        void Send(string message, IConcreteFunction to);
        void Notify(string message);
    }

    public abstract class ColleaugeBase
    {
        protected MediatorBase _mediator;
    }

    public class ConcreteColleauge1 : ColleaugeBase, IConcreteFunction
    {
        public ConcreteColleauge1(MediatorBase mediator)
        {
            _mediator = mediator;
        }

        public void Send(string message, IConcreteFunction to)
        {
            _mediator.SendMessage(/*this,*/ to, message);
        }

        public void Notify(string receiveMessage)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(receiveMessage + " : Message Received by c1");
        }
    }

    public class ConcreteColleauge2 : ColleaugeBase, IConcreteFunction
    {
        public ConcreteColleauge2(MediatorBase mediator)
        {
            _mediator = mediator;
        }

        public void Send(string message, IConcreteFunction to)
        {
            _mediator.SendMessage(/*this,*/ to, message);
        }

        public void Notify(string receiveMessage)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(receiveMessage + " : Message Received by c2");
        }
    }

    public class ConcreteColleauge3 : ColleaugeBase, IConcreteFunction
    {
        public ConcreteColleauge3(MediatorBase mediator)
        {
            _mediator = mediator;
        }

        public void Send(string message, IConcreteFunction to)
        {
            _mediator.SendMessage(/*this,*/ to, message);
        }

        public void Notify(string receiveMessage)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(receiveMessage + " : Message Received by c3");
        }
    }


static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Project1.MediatorBase mediatorBase = new Project1.ConcreteMediator();

            var c1 = new Project1.ConcreteColleauge1(mediatorBase);
            var c2 = new Project1.ConcreteColleauge2(mediatorBase);
            var c3 = new Project1.ConcreteColleauge3(mediatorBase);

            c1.Send("hellow from c1", c3);
            //c1.Send("hellow from c1", c2);
        }

Here, I am creating a new mediator object for each communication. Wouldn't that would be more better, if there is only one mediator object and that single object will be shared by all the colleague classes. So that, only a single mediator object will be used for each communication?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't understand your question... in your code, there is already a single mediator shared by all colleagues –  Thomas Levesque Nov 24 '13 at 12:17
    
ohh...yes yes. thnx for pointing out. I was bit confused with all those hierachies. –  Yeasin Abedin Siam Nov 24 '13 at 12:25
    
Why are you doing this? The mediator pattern is built-in to C# in the form of events. Why re-invent the wheel by trying to create your own mediator pattern implementation? –  David Arno Nov 24 '13 at 12:42
    
@DavidArno, events implement the Observer pattern, not the Mediator. To use events, you need a reference to the event publisher. The Mediator pattern doesn't have this constraint. –  Thomas Levesque Nov 24 '13 at 15:47
    
@ThomasLevesque You are right.. My bad. I need to engage my brain a bit before typing :) –  David Arno Nov 24 '13 at 16:09

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