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I want to re-write the following somewhat complicated plyr command so that it is faster and uses either aggregate, tapply, or data.table.

This function allows you to input multiple ID variables and measure variables and then returns several calculations. However, on much larger datasets it may not be the most efficient.


Here is the code...

require(ggplot2) # to get the diamonds data set
require(plyr)

mean_sd_for_several_variables <- function(df, lvls, measures) {
  res <- ddply(df, lvls, function(x) {
                 ret <- vector()
                 for(measure in measures) {
                   mean_sd <- c(mean(x[,measure]), sd(x[,measure]))
                   names(mean_sd) <- c(paste0("mean_", measure), paste0("sd_", measure))
                   ret <- c(ret, mean_sd)
                 }
                 return(ret)
               }
  )

  print(res)
}

... which returns:

mean_sd_for_several_variables(diamonds, c("color", "cut"), c("price","depth"))

   color       cut mean_price sd_price mean_depth sd_depth
1      D      Fair     4291.1   3286.1     64.048  3.29220
2      D      Good     3405.4   3175.1     62.366  2.22240
3      D Very Good     3470.5   3523.8     61.750  1.46223
4      D   Premium     3631.3   3711.6     61.169  1.15806
5      D     Ideal     2629.1   3001.1     61.678  0.71201
6      E      Fair     3682.3   2976.7     63.320  4.42103
7      E      Good     3423.6   3330.7     62.204  2.23059
8      E Very Good     3214.7   3408.0     61.730  1.42377
9      E   Premium     3538.9   3795.0     61.176  1.16454
10     E     Ideal     2597.6   2956.0     61.687  0.70718
11     F      Fair     3827.0   3223.3     63.508  3.70209
12     F      Good     3495.8   3202.4     62.202  2.23976
13     F Very Good     3778.8   3786.1     61.722  1.38939
14     F   Premium     4324.9   4012.0     61.260  1.16775
15     F     Ideal     3374.9   3766.6     61.676  0.69398
16     G      Fair     4239.3   3609.6     64.340  3.57340
17     G      Good     4123.5   3702.5     62.527  2.03893
18     G Very Good     3872.8   3861.4     61.841  1.33169
19     G   Premium     4500.7   4356.6     61.279  1.15341
20     G     Ideal     3720.7   4006.3     61.700  0.68714
21     H      Fair     5135.7   3886.5     64.585  3.14173
22     H      Good     4276.3   4020.7     62.500  2.09212
23     H Very Good     4535.4   4185.8     61.968  1.31895
24     H   Premium     5216.7   4466.2     61.322  1.15164
25     H     Ideal     3889.3   4013.4     61.733  0.72939
26     I      Fair     4685.4   3730.3     64.221  3.68771
27     I      Good     5078.5   4631.7     62.475  2.17958
28     I Very Good     5255.9   4687.1     61.935  1.32890
29     I   Premium     5946.2   5053.7     61.329  1.15338
30     I     Ideal     4452.0   4505.2     61.794  0.72334
31     J      Fair     4975.7   4050.5     64.357  3.31595
32     J      Good     4574.2   3707.8     62.396  2.12091
33     J Very Good     5103.5   4135.7     61.902  1.33679
34     J   Premium     6294.6   4788.9     61.390  1.13989
35     J     Ideal     4918.2   4476.2     61.822  0.94669
share|improve this question
    
hmm, don't have much time right know, but feel that I did something similar in my gateveys package. The function calcShares here: github.com/mbannert/gateveys/blob/master/R/gateveys.R uses data.table in similar way. Not sure if this is more intuitive to you, but at least is data.table. –  Matt Bannert Nov 24 '13 at 20:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using aggregate

> result <- aggregate(cbind(price, depth) ~ color+cut,
                  FUN=function(x) c(mean=mean(x), sd=sd(x)),
                  data=diamonds)
> do.call(data.frame, result)
   color       cut price.mean price.sd depth.mean   depth.sd
1      D      Fair   4291.061 3286.114 64.0484663  3.2921972
2      E      Fair   3682.312 2976.652 63.3196429  4.4210329
3      F      Fair   3827.003 3223.303 63.5080128  3.7020938
4      G      Fair   4239.255 3609.644 64.3398089  3.5733985
5      H      Fair   5135.683 3886.482 64.5851485  3.1417311
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm.. I'm getting the following error: Error in FUN(X[[1L]], ...) : array elements do not match –  dchandler Nov 24 '13 at 21:26
    
try again, I dont get any error. –  Jilber Nov 24 '13 at 21:47
    
sorry about that. it was a package called memisc. grrr! –  dchandler Nov 25 '13 at 16:10
    
@dchandler, remember you can upvote answers and accept one when you feel your question is correctly answered ;) –  Jilber Nov 25 '13 at 16:31
1  
@dchandler if you want to make proper formula you have to create proper string first. Use paste0 or paste to insert "+" between variables, in your example: formula( paste0( paste0(dependent_vars, collapse = "+"), "~", paste0(independent_vars, collapse = "+"))) –  BartekCh Nov 25 '13 at 21:27
show 6 more comments

Here is the data.table solution

mean_and_sd <- function(.SD){
  x1 = lapply(.SD, mean)
  x2 = lapply(.SD, sd)
  cbind(x1, x2) 
}

library(data.table)
DT = data.table(diamonds)
DT[, mean_and_sd(.SD), by = c("cut", "color"), .SDcols = c("price", "carat")]

You can throw this into a function that will accept the desired inputs and return the appropriate data frame.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that .SD is optimised for lapply(.SD, ...) in j and therefore this'll be slower as the number of groups in by increase. An alternative way I could think of is: DT[, unlist(lapply(.SD, function(x) list(mean=mean(x), sd=sd(x))), rec=FALSE), by=list(cut, color), .SDcols=c("price", "carat")] (the difference in time will be more dramatic as the number of .SDcols increase, in addition to number of groups, as well). –  Arun Nov 24 '13 at 21:52
1  
Thanks @Arun. I was struggling with how to add both mean and sd inside lapply. This alternative sounds awesome. –  Ramnath Nov 24 '13 at 22:47
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