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I am designing an interface that displays a list of panels, each with its own model. I want to be able to render each panel so it has its own model using the model from the parent controller.

Something like:

function Parent() {
    this.panels = [{name: "Foo", place: "Bar"}, {name: "Hello", place: "World"}];
}
function Child(model) {
    var model = model //{name: "Foo", place: "Bar"}
}
for (var i = 0; i < Parent.panels.length; i++) {
    new Child(Parent.panels[0]);
}

My question is this: In an "angular state-of-mind", what is the best way to tackle this?

My current plan is as follows. I will have two controllers, one for the list of panels, and one for each individual panel. So, something like this:

angular.module("panelApp", [])
    .service("panelService", function() {
        var panels = [/* panel classes */];
        return {
           getPanels: function() { return panels }
        }
    })
    .controller("PanelListCtrl", ["$scope", "panelService", function($scope, panelService) {
        $scope.panels = panelService.getPanels();
        $scope.currentPanel = $scope.panels[0];
    })
    .controller("PanelCtrl", ["$scope", "panelService", function($scope, panelService) {
        //this is where stuff gets hazy
        for (var i = 0; i < PanelListCtrl.panels.length; i++) {
           //generate child panels... somehow... =(
        }
    })

I'm clearly not doing this right, but the general idea is that I want to be able to encapsulate functionality for both the list and each individual panel.

Another way I came up with was through using a directive:

angular.module("panelApp", [])
    .service("panelService", function() {
        var panels = [/* panel classes */];
        return {
           getPanels: function() { return panels }
        }
    })
    .controller("PanelListCtrl", ["$scope", "panelService", function($scope, panelService) {
        $scope.panels = panelService.getPanels();
        $scope.currentPanel = $scope.panels[0];
    })
    .directive("panel", function() {
        require:"PanelListCtrl",
        restrict: "E",
        link: function(scope, element, attrs, panelListCtrl) {
            for (var i = 0; i < panelListCtrl.panels.length; i++) {
                //generate markup... somehow. How can one create directive markup in the DOM on the fly??
            }
        },
        templateUrl: "template.html"
    })

I've been up against this roadblack for atleast an hour now. Please help.

NOTES

Something I forgot to mention is that the number of panels being displayed is variable. Because of this, there is no markup in the DOM when the page is loaded, it has to be injected dynamically. I am new to angular, and I have no idea how to to dynamically add elements to the page based on the MV* approach the framework uses.

share|improve this question
    
In directives u can make and add elements to the Dom as children of the current elem, u can create new Dom elements using document.createElement or $compile(thingtocompile)(scope) –  shaunhusain Nov 24 '13 at 20:55
    
@shaunhusain do you think you could provide an example? –  dopatraman Nov 24 '13 at 21:02
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should get you started: http://plnkr.co/edit/b7KbXMPWOhAG50ajYyYN?p=preview

The basic idea you have is sound, of using hierarchical scopes and it can be implemented using both scope inheritance in controllers as well as between a controller and a directive. Since I suspect that what you need is primarily UI, then you will be better off defining a directive.

Also, when it comes to generating the template on the fly, what you probably want is one static template for a panel populated with values you want. Then you can use ng-repeat to generate many of of those.

Controller

.controller("PanelListCtrl", ["$scope", "panelService", function($scope, panelService) {
    $scope.panels = panelService.getPanels();

    // Saving the `isActive` property in the model, keeping the controller thin.
    $scope.panels[0].isActive = true;

    // This will manage the selection of the correct panel.
    $scope.selectPanel = function (panel) {
      $scope.panels.forEach(function (p) {
        p.isActive = p === panel;
      });
    };
}])
.directive("panel", function() {
  return {
    restrict: "A",
    link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
        scope.$watch(attrs.panel, function (newVal) {
          scope.panel = newVal;  // <-- watch and populate the `panel` in the current scope.
          // The directive cam be made to
          // work even without this link function (because of scope
          // inheritence) but the best-practise is to keep the directives
          // as loosely coupled with the controller as possible.
          // In this case, you'll be free the name the panel variable anything 
          // in the controller as long
          // as you pass the variable to the directive: <div panel="nameOfPanel"></div>
        })
    },
    templateUrl: "panel.html"  // <-- template is here for One of the panes.
  }
})

Template

<body ng-controller="PanelListCtrl">
  <div ng-repeat="p in panels">
    <button ng-click="selectPanel(p)">Select panel {{$index}}</button>
    <div panel="p"></div>
  </div>
</body>
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting... I'm a little lost though. What does scope.$watch do? I thought the ngClick function would take care of selecting the proper panel. –  dopatraman Nov 24 '13 at 21:47
    
@dopatraman The $watch in this case will notice if the value of the variable assigned to panel attribute on the directive changes and will refresh the template with the new variable. If the panel will stay static after the first fetching, then you can get away with scope.panel = scope.$eval(attrs.panel). This can also be achieved via [isolating scope](docs.angularjs.org/guide/directive#creating-custom-directives_source): scope: { panel: '=' } in the directive. –  musically_ut Nov 24 '13 at 21:55
    
But what I'm trying to understand is why the attr would ever change? It looks like the panel attribute is being watched. Also, what is the panel attribute being used for? Why not just use the directive on a <panel></panel> element? Is there an advantage either way? –  dopatraman Nov 24 '13 at 22:07
    
@dopatraman Advantage in using it as an attribute rather than as element is that it'll work with IE8 and lower. The watching an attribute for change is merely good practise. You can do the same thing via scope.panel = scope.$eval(attrs.panel). –  musically_ut Nov 24 '13 at 22:13
    
But again, under what circumstances/actions would the attribute change? (What is the purpose in watching it?) No actions change the attribute of a panel... –  dopatraman Nov 24 '13 at 22:27
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