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Is it possible in Java 7 to instantiate an anonymous inner class with a generic type using a Class object that I have in hand?

Here's the simplified version of the generic class I'm trying to instantiate:

abstract class DomainBuilder<E> {

    private final Class<E> entityClass

    public DomainBuilder() {
        this.entityClass = (Class<E>) ((ParameterizedType) getClass().getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0];
    }

    ...
}

Creating an anonymous inner class when I specify the class I want to build at compile time works fine:

DomainBuilder builder = new DomainBuilder<MyDomainClass>() {}

I'd like to be able to make it so that I can use a Class variable that I've determined at run-time like this, but haven't figured out how to yet:

Class clazz = MyDomainClass.class
...
DomainBuilder builder = new DomainBuilder<clazz>() {}

I've also tried creating methods along these lines without luck:

Class clazz = MyDomainClass.class
DomainBuilder builder = builderFor(clazz)

public static DomainBuilder<T> builderFor(Class<T> t) {
    return new DomainBuilder<T>(entityManager){}
}

Is something like this possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'll have to create an entirely separate constructor for when the Class object is being passed in directly. You can't infer it again the way you're trying to.

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So you mean one where my DomainBuilder takes a Class argument and just sets that variable directly? That might work for my use case, thanks for the suggestion. –  Ted Naleid Nov 24 '13 at 21:07

I'd like to be able to make it so that I can use a Class variable that I've determined at run-time like this, but haven't figured out how to yet:

 Class clazz = MyDomainClass.class ... DomainBuilder 
 builder = new  DomainBuilder<clazz>() {}

we can't actually do it this way. Because by doing so, we are not defining a class Type in the diagonal <>, rather passing an object claszz of type Class.

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