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How would one superimpose rows of different lengths onto a matrix in Matlab? That is, I would like the first x number of elements and the last y number of elements in row z of matrix A to be zero with x and y specified in two column vectors of length Z (so corresponding to the number of rows of matrix A). I can only think of a solution in terms of a simple loop but am looking for a more elegant solution avoiding the use of a loop as this piece of code needs to be run thousands of times in a main loop.

Edit

As confirmed by @randomatlabuser, this is what the asker wants to do without a loop:

M = 1e4; N = 1e3; A = randn(M, N);
x = randi([0, N], [M, 1]);
y = randi([0, N], [M, 1]);
for hh = 1:M
  A(hh, 1:x(hh)) = 0;
  A(hh, (N - y(hh) + 1):N) = 0;
end
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2  
And how do you want to fill the remaining (nonzero) vaules? Could you give a simple example? –  Luis Mendo Nov 24 '13 at 22:06
    
A would already be filled, but I want to replace the first x and last y number of elements of each row with zeros, where x and y are different for each row and defined in two column vectors. –  user3029330 Nov 25 '13 at 6:43
    
Are x and y the same in all iterations of the main loop? –  Luis Mendo Nov 25 '13 at 11:13
    
@user3029330 Next time if you already have a working solution you want to improve on, please include it to prevent any confusion or double work. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Jan 2 at 8:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do it this way:

A = rand(4,6); %// example data
x = [1; 2; 1; 3]; %// example data
y = [1; 2; 1; 2]; %// example data

[M N] = size(A);
col = 1:N;
B = A.* ( bsxfun(@gt, col, x) & bsxfun(@le, col, (N-y)) );

The result in this example is:

>> A

A =

    0.0168    0.8797    0.7367    0.9859    0.5385    0.9745
    0.9274    0.4161    0.0567    0.0649    0.7961    0.1616
    0.3935    0.8690    0.8386    0.0308    0.5494    0.5525
    0.7615    0.1895    0.0002    0.0919    0.7167    0.6101

>> B

B =

         0    0.8797    0.7367    0.9859    0.5385         0
         0         0    0.0567    0.0649         0         0
         0    0.8690    0.8386    0.0308    0.5494         0
         0         0         0    0.0919         0         0

If x and y are the same in all iterations of your main loop, you can save time by computing the mask before the loop:

[M N] = size(A);
col = 1:N;
mask = bsxfun(@gt, col, x) & bsxfun(@le, col, (N-y));

and then at each iteration you only have to apply the pre-computed mask:

B = A.*mask;
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1  
+1 This approach works. However when M and N are large it seems to be slower than looping - is there another way? If M = 1e4;, N = 1e3; and A = randn(M, N);, the loop does it in 0.630966 seconds, ndgrid does it in 1.791081 seconds. –  randomatlabuser Nov 25 '13 at 20:33
1  
@randomatlabuser Thanks! ndgrid uses more memory (because it generates all combinations of row and column), and that's probably what is causing the increased running time for large sizes. –  Luis Mendo Nov 25 '13 at 21:56
1  
@randomatlabuser I've replaced ndgrid by bsxfun. Running time is much smaller now. Thanks for the heads up! Still, the loop seems to be faster –  Luis Mendo Nov 25 '13 at 22:12
1  
On my computer bsxfun works faster than the loop: an average of 0.50 seconds against 0.67. –  randomatlabuser Nov 25 '13 at 23:06
1  
@user3029330 If you can do it in a simple single loop, there is often not much to gain by avoiding a loop. However, if speed really is a concern then bsxfun is often the way to go as shown here. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Jan 2 at 8:37

What you want to do is:

M = 1e4; N = 1e3; A = randn(M, N);
x = randi([0, N], [M, 1]);
y = randi([0, N], [M, 1]);
for hh = 1:M
  A(hh, 1:x(hh)) = 0;
  A(hh, (N - y(hh) + 1):N) = 0;
end

but without a loop, right?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, exactly. Could that be done? Perhaps using a clever form of linear indexing of some sort? –  user3029330 Nov 25 '13 at 6:39
1  
I wonder if it can be solved by using bsxfun –  randomatlabuser Nov 25 '13 at 10:35
1  
I understand why you posted this, but I'm afraid this is not an answer. I have included this in the question (where it belongs). -- Please clean up this 'answer' now. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Jan 2 at 8:45
1  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  lrineau Jan 2 at 9:59

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