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My aim is to develop a SOAP web service in Java.
I want to go with the 'contract first approach'.
The obvious steps (in order) are:

  1. Create a WSDL file from scratch
  2. Generate Java classes using wsdl2java
  3. Develop business logic round the generated Java classes

However, I am a little apprehensive about writing a WSDL from scratch (given the complexity).
I just wanted to know if there are any standard tools which are used to author a WSDL file from scratch?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Searching around the web, I realized that you have learn how to author WSDL yourself. There are no wizard like tools that ask you few simple questions and do it for you.

WSDL is yet another XML schema definition (aka XSD) which defines the web service.
So using any standard IDE like IntelliJ IDEA, Eclipse, NetBeans should do the trick.

If you are apprehensive about authoring the WSDL, it may be because you are not comfortable with the following concepts (as in my case). So pull up your socks and spend some time to understand the following:

  • XML
  • XML Namespaces
  • XML Schema (XSD)

Here are a few resources that may help you write your own WSDL from scratch:

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1  
As an addition: here are some more resources that once helped me with understanding of WSDL and SOAP: Understanding web services specifications, Part 1: SOAP, Understanding web services, Part 2: Web Services Description Language (WSDL), Which style of WSDL should I use? –  informatik01 Nov 27 '13 at 0:00

Doing the same search around the web I managed to find only one free tool which may help writing WSDL.

This plugin is part of Eclipse Web Tools Platform Project and gives you full visual support when building WSDL document.

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1  
In freeware opensource: { Eclipse WTP, Netbeans IDE }. In paid solutions: { oXygen xml editor, Altova XMLSpy }. There's one more, but not yet out: { ws.apache.org/woden } –  Amit Sharma Nov 25 '13 at 23:14

you can also start these process to generate WSDL.

1.) write java class. like

package test.web.service;
import javax.jws.WebMethod;
import javax.jws.WebService;
@WebService
public class WebServiceServer {
@WebMethod
public int addition(int a,int b){
    return a+b;
}

}

providing a link : where you can learn soap web servive easily in effective manner http://javabrains.koushik.org/p/java-ee.html

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2  
Your method does not represent Contract First approach - which is the subject of this question. Thanks for the link :) will watch these videos –  Maciej Dobrowolski Nov 25 '13 at 21:01
    
Your answer explains the 'code first' approach, not the 'wsdl first' approach. –  Amit Sharma Nov 25 '13 at 23:09
    
@MaciejDobrowolski : thanks a lot, i am also a soap beginner, so i suggested the same as i know, but i got 1 more good question. from now i will try to know. –  Piyush Nov 27 '13 at 3:08
4  
He didn't make it super-clear, but what he was suggesting is to use code-first to bootstrap your WSDL-first effort. It's kind of code-first-then-WSDL-first approach :-). That is, you can write just a bit of code first, with what you know about the problem space. The service doesn't really have to do anything. Then get your service up and running and check the ?wsdl URL, to see what the generated WSDL looks like, and possibly copy/paste it as your first-cut WSDL-first project. –  MikeThomas Feb 21 '14 at 0:13

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