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I have written this simple main that I compiled with the flag -fno-stack-protector.

#include <stdio.h>
int pos;
char c = 0;

void
bof(unsigned int i)
{
   fprintf(stderr, "BOF %u\n", i);
}

void 
foo() 
{
   unsigned char buf[3];
   while(c != 'X') {
    scanf(" %c", &c);
    buf[pos++] = c;
  }
}

int 
main() {
  fprintf(stderr, "%p\n", bof);
  foo();
  return 0;
}

I'm trying to pass 0 to the input variable of the bof function, and to be sure I surrounded the address of the bof function with zeros. (note that I use ubuntu 12.04 v. 64 bit):

perl -e 'print "\x00"x24 . "\xa4\x05\x40\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00" . "\x00"x8 . "X"'

The problem is that executing the program with this buffer the printed result is not zero (it is not even constant), but when I try to debug the program: perl -e 'print "\x00"x24 . "\xa4\x05\x40\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00" . "\x00"x8 . "X"' > file

(gdb) b 19
Breakpoint 4 at 0x40061b: file main.c, line 19.
(gdb) r < file
The program being debugged has been started already.

Start it from the beginning? (y or n) y
Starting program: /home/badnack/Documents/Code/stuff/bof/bof < file
0x4005a4

Breakpoint 4, foo () at main.c:19
19  }
(gdb) l
14    unsigned char buf[3];
15    while(c != 'X') {
16      scanf(" %c", &c);
17      buf[pos++] = c;
18    }
19  }
20  
21  int 
22  main() {
23    fprintf(stderr, "%p\n", bof);
(gdb) l
24    foo();
25    return 0;
26  }
(gdb) disass
Dump of assembler code for function foo:
   0x00000000004005d0 <+0>: push   %rbp
   0x00000000004005d1 <+1>: mov    %rsp,%rbp
   0x00000000004005d4 <+4>: sub    $0x10,%rsp
   0x00000000004005d8 <+8>: jmp    0x400610 <foo+64>
   0x00000000004005da <+10>:    mov    $0x400755,%eax
   0x00000000004005df <+15>:    mov    $0x601040,%esi
   0x00000000004005e4 <+20>:    mov    %rax,%rdi
   0x00000000004005e7 <+23>:    mov    $0x0,%eax
   0x00000000004005ec <+28>:    callq  0x4004b0 <__isoc99_scanf@plt>
   0x00000000004005f1 <+33>:    mov    0x200a4d(%rip),%eax        # 0x601044 <pos>
   0x00000000004005f7 <+39>:    movzbl 0x200a42(%rip),%edx        # 0x601040 <c>
   0x00000000004005fe <+46>:    mov    %edx,%ecx
   0x0000000000400600 <+48>:    movslq %eax,%rdx
   0x0000000000400603 <+51>:    mov    %cl,-0x10(%rbp,%rdx,1)
   0x0000000000400607 <+55>:    add    $0x1,%eax
   0x000000000040060a <+58>:    mov    %eax,0x200a34(%rip)        # 0x601044 <pos>
   0x0000000000400610 <+64>:    movzbl 0x200a29(%rip),%eax        # 0x601040 <c>
   0x0000000000400617 <+71>:    cmp    $0x58,%al
   0x0000000000400619 <+73>:    jne    0x4005da <foo+10>
=> 0x000000000040061b <+75>:    leaveq 
   0x000000000040061c <+76>:    retq   
End of assembler dump.
(gdb) ni
0x000000000040061c  19  }
(gdb) x/10xg $rsp
0x7fffffffe278: 0x00000000004005a4  0x0000000000000000
0x7fffffffe288: 0x00007ffff7a3b758  0x0000000000000000
0x7fffffffe298: 0x00007fffffffe368  0x0000000100000000
0x7fffffffe2a8: 0x000000000040061d  0x0000000000000000
0x7fffffffe2b8: 0xbc2b8a4223791ede  0x00000000004004c0
(gdb) n
bof (i=0) at main.c:7
7   {
(gdb) x/10xg $rsp
0x7fffffffe280: 0x0000000000000000  0x00007ffff7a3b758
0x7fffffffe290: 0x0000000000000000  0x00007fffffffe368
0x7fffffffe2a0: 0x0000000100000000  0x000000000040061d
0x7fffffffe2b0: 0x0000000000000000  0xbc2b8a4223791ede
0x7fffffffe2c0: 0x00000000004004c0  0x00007fffffffe360
(gdb) n
8     fprintf(stderr, "BOF %u\n", i);
(gdb) n
BOF 4158473024
9   }
(gdb) x/10xg $rsp
0x7fffffffe268: 0x0000000000000000  0xf7dd434000000000
0x7fffffffe278: 0x0000000000000000  0x0000000000000000
0x7fffffffe288: 0x00007ffff7a3b758  0x0000000000000000
0x7fffffffe298: 0x00007fffffffe368  0x0000000100000000
0x7fffffffe2a8: 0x000000000040061d  0x0000000000000000
(gdb) 

The i variable seems to receive the correct value, but then another value is printed (which is exactly the decimal representation of 0xf7dd434000000000. What is happening? Why this cell of memory is not present also before?

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