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Is there a way to use the sort() method or any other method to sort a list by column? Lets say I have the list:

[
[John,2],
[Jim,9],
[Jason,1]
]

And I wanted to sort it so that it would look like this:

[
[Jason,1],
[John,2],
[Jim,9],
]

What would be the best approach to do this?

Edit:

Right now I am running into an index out of range error. I have a 2 dimensional array that is lets say 1000 rows b 3 columns. I want to sort it based on the third column. Is this the right code for that?

sorted_list = sorted(list_not_sorted, key=lambda x:x[2])
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see: stackoverflow.com/questions/2828059/… –  duhaime Nov 25 '13 at 0:40
    
Right now I am running into an index out of range error. I have a 2 dimensional array that is lets say 1000 rows b 3 columns. I want to sort it based on the third column. Is this the right code for that? sorted_list = sorted(list_not_sorted, key=lambda x:x[2]) –  Web Hopeful Nov 25 '13 at 1:11
    
In response to your edit, since lists are zero indexed, yes x[2] is the third column. The moral of the story is, you can use a key and lambda or an actual function to sort by some stipulation in the sorted and sort functions. –  squiguy Nov 25 '13 at 2:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes. The sorted built-in accepts a key argument:

sorted(li,key=lambda x: x[1])
Out[31]: [['Jason', 1], ['John', 2], ['Jim', 9]]

note that sorted returns a new list. If you want to sort in-place, use the .sort method of your list (which also, conveniently, accepts a key argument).

or alternatively,

from operator import itemgetter
sorted(li,key=itemgetter(1))
Out[33]: [['Jason', 1], ['John', 2], ['Jim', 9]]

Read more on the python wiki.

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Might want to mention that this will return a new list. –  iCodez Nov 25 '13 at 1:02
    
Indeed. If you want to modify the original list, that would be li.sort(key=whatever). –  user2357112 Nov 25 '13 at 1:03

You can use the sorted method with a key.

sorted(a, key=lambda x : x[1])
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The optional key parameter to sort/sorted is a function. The function is called for each item and the return values determine the ordering of the sort

>>> lst = [['John', 2], ['Jim', 9], ['Jason', 1]]
>>> def my_key_func(item):
...     print("The key for {} is {}".format(item, item[1]))
...     return item[1]
... 
>>> sorted(lst, key=my_key_func)
The key for ['John', 2] is 2
The key for ['Jim', 9] is 9
The key for ['Jason', 1] is 1
[['Jason', 1], ['John', 2], ['Jim', 9]]

taking the print out of the function leaves

>>> def my_key_func(item):
...     return item[1]

This function is simple enough to write "inline" as a lambda function

>>> sorted(lst, key=lambda item: item[1])
[['Jason', 1], ['John', 2], ['Jim', 9]]
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You can use list.sort with its optional key parameter and a lambda expression:

>>> lst = [
...     ['John',2],
...     ['Jim',9],
...     ['Jason',1]
... ]
>>> lst.sort(key=lambda x:x[1])
>>> lst
[['Jason', 1], ['John', 2], ['Jim', 9]]
>>>

This will sort the list in-place.


Note that for large lists, it will be faster to use operator.itemgetter instead of a lambda:

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> lst = [
...     ['John',2],
...     ['Jim',9],
...     ['Jason',1]
... ]
>>> lst.sort(key=itemgetter(1))
>>> lst
[['Jason', 1], ['John', 2], ['Jim', 9]]
>>>
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What exactly is the "lambda" key? –  Web Hopeful Nov 25 '13 at 0:51
    
@user3024130 - The lambda creates an inline function for the key parameter. I added a link to explain better. Using a lambda would be no different than doing def func(x): return x[1] and then lst.sort(key=func). –  iCodez Nov 25 '13 at 0:54
    
Okay that makes sense. How would you sort it from highest to lowest instead of lowest to highest? –  Web Hopeful Nov 25 '13 at 1:35
    
@user3024130 - Simple. Use this: lst.sort(key=lambda x:x[1], reverse=True). list.sort also takes an optional reverse parameter. If it is set to True, the list is sorted highest to lowest. Otherwise, it is lowest to highest. –  iCodez Nov 25 '13 at 1:43

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