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I don't get why this isn't working... For example I have this.

struct node {
    int data;
    struct node* next;
};

static int length(struct node* head) {
   Does Stuff

};

void main() (  
   int i; 
   struct node* head;
   i = length(head);
);

but the code doesn't want to work... I get the wrong output. I'm trying to send the pointer to my functions so that they can have access to the data that I malloc. I will post the full code bellow:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct node {
    int data;
    struct node* next;
};

static int length(struct node* head);
static void push(struct node* head, int data);
static int pop(struct node* head);
static void appendNode(struct node* head, int data);
static struct node *copyList(struct node* head);
static void printList(struct node* head);



/************************************************************
 length - return length of a list
 ************************************************************/
int length(struct node* head) {
    int count = 0;
    struct node* current = NULL;

    current = head;
    while (current != NULL) {
        current = current->next;
        ++count;
    }

    return count;
}


/************************************************************
 push - add new node at beginning of list
 ************************************************************/
void push(struct node* head, int data) {
    struct node* new_ptr = NULL;

    new_ptr = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    new_ptr->data = data;
    new_ptr->next = head;

    head = new_ptr;
}

/************************************************************
 pop - delete node at beginning of non-empty list and return its data
 ************************************************************/
int pop(struct node* head) {
    int val = 0;
    struct node* temp = NULL;

    if (head != NULL) {
        val = head->data;
        temp = head->next;
        free(head);
        head = temp;
    }

    return(val);
}

/************************************************************
 appendNode - add new node at end of list
 ************************************************************/
void appendNode(struct node* head, int data) {
    struct node* current = NULL;
    struct node* previous = NULL;
    struct node* new_ptr = NULL;

    current = head;
    previous = current;
    while (current != NULL) {
        previous = current;
        current = current->next;
    }

    new_ptr = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    new_ptr->data = data;
    new_ptr->next = NULL;

    previous = new_ptr;

}

/************************************************************
 copyList - return new copy of list
 ************************************************************/
struct node* copyList(struct node* head) {
    struct node* copy = NULL;
    struct node* current = NULL;
    struct node* new_ptr = NULL;

    /* Copy current head to copy */
    current = head;
    while (current != NULL) {
        appendNode(copy, current->data);
        current = current->next;
    }

    return copy;
}


/************************************************************
 printList - print linked list as "List: < 2, 5, 6 >" (example)
 ************************************************************/
void printList(struct node* head) {
    struct node* current = NULL;

    printf("List: < ");

    current = head;
    if (current == NULL)
        printf("none ");

    while (current != NULL) {
        printf("%d", current->data);
        current = current->next;
        if (current != NULL)
            printf(", ");
    }

    printf(" >\n");
}

void main() {
    int i;                      // index used for loops
    struct node *list_a;        // a new list
    struct node *list_a_copy;   // copy of list
    list_a = NULL;                // initialize empty list
    list_a_copy = NULL;           // initialize empy list


    // test push
    for (i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
        push(list_a, i);

    // test length
    printf("Length of list = %d\n", length(list_a));

    // test print head list
    printf("head:\n");
    printList(list_a);

    // test append node
    for (i = 4; i < 8; ++i)
        appendNode(list_a, i);

    // test print head list
    printf("head(append):\n");
    printList(list_a);

    // make a copy of list
    list_a_copy = copyList(list_a);

    // test pop head list
    for (i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
        printf("%d popped\n", pop(list_a));

    // test print copy list
    printf("head copy:\n");
    printList(list_a_copy);

    // test pop copy list
    for (i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
        printf("%d popped\n", pop(list_a_copy));

}

Thank you for you help. I'm still learning these C pointers, and I know I'm close.

Cheers

share|improve this question
    
You asking about hte long code, or the short code? The short code pass an uninitialized pointer to the length function. That's bad. –  RichardPlunkett Nov 25 '13 at 3:01
    
The first code was an example, obviously is was not "complete." I guess it was confusing, sorry. –  Jeffrey Haines Nov 25 '13 at 3:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I looked into function push():

void push(struct node* head, int data) {
    struct node* new_ptr = NULL;

    new_ptr = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    new_ptr->data = data;
    new_ptr->next = head;

    head = new_ptr;
}

The way you assign head = new_ptr; is wrong. Doing so only, head has effect within in the function, head won't be pointed to the memory you allocated after push() is called. So you need to fix your push() function:

void push(struct node **head, int data) {
    if ((*head) == null)
        (*head) = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    (*head)->data = data;
    (*head)->next = head;
}
share|improve this answer
    
See edit, I forgot to confirm the edit. –  Krypton Nov 25 '13 at 3:41

The problem is that you are passing a pointer to a node in your methods. This means that what you are modifying is a local parameter and not what you are passing to the method. Why is this? Because passing by value copies the parameter, to the address is directly copied.

struct Node *list_a = NULL;
push(list_a, 5);

When you call push, what happens is that a copy of the variable list_a is pushed onto the stack and then the function is called. The same thing, if you think about it, happens with simple cases:

int x = 5;
add(x, 5);

void add(int a, int b) { a += b; } // <-- this won't modify the x passed

So here

void push(struct Node *head, int value) {
  head = something;
}

you are not modifying the original list_a but rather a copy of it which has been passed to the function.

To be able to modify the original pointer you need to pass the address to it, so a pointer to the pointer of the head of the list. This can be done easily:

struct Node *list_a = NULL;
push(&node, 5);

void push (struct Node **node, int value) {
  ...
  *node = malloc(..);
}

So here the address of the variable list_a is passed to the function, dereferencing it allows you to modify the real value instead that just a copy.

share|improve this answer

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