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Here's the one I'm using:

<?php
final class Database {
    private static $oDb;
    public static function init() {
        if(self::$oDb == NULL)
        {
            self::$oDb = mysql_connect('localhost', 'mysql_user', 'mysql_password') or die(mysql_error());
            mysql_select_db('mysql_db_name', self::$oDb) or die (mysql_error());;
        }
        return self::$oDb;
    }
    public function query($sql)
    {
        return mysql_query($sql) or die(mysql_error());
    }
}
?>

Usage:

$oDb = Database::init();
$sql = foo;
$oDb->query($sql);

Assuming that I only want it to connect and execute this one query function, are there any improvements I should make on the class? Memory or efficiency of code?

Also, is there an efficient way I can get the db credentials from a config file? I know I can't use includes inside my class.

share|improve this question
    
Why cant you use includes inside of your class? There's no technical reason why you can't though from a coding practice you may want to try to avoid it. –  Darrell Brogdon Jan 7 '10 at 5:48
    
I think he is thinking you can't use it outside of a function... –  Tyler Carter Jan 7 '10 at 5:54
    
My config files are just sets of define("name", "value");. No parsing required. –  Justin Johnson Jan 7 '10 at 5:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I usually use lazy initialization for this sort of situation and only have one public method (in this case), with a private constructor to prevent outside instantiation (per the Singleton pattern):

class Database {
  private static $instance;
  private $conn;

  private function Database() {
    // do init stuff
    require_once('dbconfig.php'); // contains define('DB_USER', 'webuser'); etc...
    $this->conn = mysql_connect(DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASS); // do error checking
  }

  public static function getInstance() {
    if(!self::$instance) {
      self::$instance = new Database();
    }
    return self::$instance;
  }

  public static function query($sql) {
    $instance = self::getInstance();
    return mysql_query($sql, $instance->conn);
  }
}

Then you can just call $dbHandle = Database::getInstance() anytime you need to use it. Or in this case since a static query method is defined, you can use Database::query("select * from xx;"); without having to call any sort of init at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Woudn't having that require_once on a relative path mean that it would break if I included the class file itself on a different directory? Like include 'db.class.php' in index.php vs admin/index.php –  Citizen Jan 7 '10 at 15:50
    
Typically, I'll define a ROOT_DIR or some such variable using dirname() style functions to get the absolute path to the root of my site, and then I'd use something like require_once(ROOT_DIR.'/config/db.config.php');. That way it doesn't matter where the current dir is when grabbing the config. –  Dan Breen Jan 7 '10 at 21:59
    
I'm probably asking too much, but when I try to use your class, I get a rabbit hole of errors. Added 'function' to your 'public static' lines and then i get an error for using $this out of object context. Any ideas? –  Citizen Jan 7 '10 at 23:16
    
Sorry, I didn't actually try to run this, so I missed a few syntax errors. I've edited the post and tested it; it works now. The $this->instance should have been self::$instance in the public static method. –  Dan Breen Jan 8 '10 at 3:18
    
This is ancient, but for posterity, easier than keeping a ROOT_DIR variable is simply using the build-in __DIR__ constant. Say your db class is in a subdir of root. You could then call require_once(__DIR__.'/../config/db.config.php'); –  Nathan Stretch Feb 19 '13 at 8:25

That's a simple as it gets, that will work fine.

You can pass your credentials to init();

include(config.php);
$oDb = Database::init( DB_HOST, DB_NAME, DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD );
$sql = foo;
$oDb->query($sql);
share|improve this answer

You can use an include inside a function inside a class

<?php
final class Database {
    private static $oDb;
    public static function init() {
        if(self::$oDb == NULL)
        {
            include('config.php')
            self::$oDb = mysql_connect(DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASS) or die(mysql_error());
            mysql_select_db(DB_NAME, self::$oDb) or die (mysql_error());;
        }
        return self::$oDb;
    }
    public function query($sql)
    {
        return mysql_query($sql) or die(mysql_error());
    }
}
?>

or you can just pass the variables...

<?php
final class Database {
    private static $oDb;
    public static function init($host, $user, $pass, $name) {
        if(self::$oDb == NULL)
        {
            self::$oDb = mysql_connect($host,$user,$pass) or die(mysql_error());
            mysql_select_db($name, self::$oDb) or die (mysql_error());;
        }
        return self::$oDb;
    }
    public function query($sql)
    {
        return mysql_query($sql) or die(mysql_error());
    }
}
?>

or you can store the credentials in a php.ini file

<?php
final class Database {
    private static $oDb;
    public static function init($db_name) {
        if(self::$oDb == NULL)
        {
            self::$oDb = mysql_connect() or die(mysql_error());
            mysql_select_db($db_name, self::$oDb) or die (mysql_error());;
        }
        return self::$oDb;
    }
    public function query($sql)
    {
        return mysql_query($sql) or die(mysql_error());
    }
}
?>

php.ini file:

mysql.default_host="host"
mysql.default_user="user"
mysql.default_password="password"
share|improve this answer

For singleton classes, the model that Dan Breen followed is cleanest and very common. However, in this case, I would also allow the getInstance method to accept some parameters so that you can override your default configuration at instantiation time, or just get a reference without creating a connection (both use-cases happen from time to time).

Database.php

require_once("../path/to/config/database.php");

class Database {
  private static $instances = array();

  private function Database($host, $user, $password, $name) {
    // do init stuff
  }

  public static getInstance(
    $host=DB_HOST, $user=DB_USER, $password=DB_PASSWORD, $name=DB_NAME
  ) {
    $key = strtolower($host . $user . $password . $name);

    if ( !$self::instances[$key] ) {
      $self::instances[$key] = new Database($host, $user, $password, $name);
    }
    return $self::instances[$key];
  }
}

..config/database.php:

define("DB_HOST", "localhost");
define("DB_USER", "mrsqlguy");
define("DB_PASS", "!!!");
define("DB_NAME", "just_another_wordpress");

Edit: I've changed it to act more like a flyweight to ensure that you only get one instance for each connect location/database. This addresses your concerns and maintains a degree of flexibility.

share|improve this answer
    
Being flexible is nice and I like this answer, but a potential problem is that since it's only initialized once, it could lead to very strange problems later. Namely, if the programmer is calling getInstance with some new connection parameters but somewhere else it already made the initial call with different ones, it could be difficult to figure out that it's not using the parameters passed in the second time. –  Dan Breen Jan 7 '10 at 6:10

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