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Assume a class WorkerThread that implements a field running which indicates whether the thread should continue to work after it was started or not.

class WorkerThread(threading.Thread):

    running = False

    def run(self):
        self.running = True
        while self.running:
            # .. do some important stuff
            pass

def main():
    t = WorkerThread()
    t.start()

    # .. do other important stuff

    t.running = False
    t.join()

Is there something that could possibly go wrong when modifying t.running from the main thread, without locking the read and write operations to this field? What is it?

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Not an answer, but You could try using a lock instead. Have the thread have a threading.Lock instance, have the main method acquire it. In the run method, use while not self.lock.acquire(False):, then release in main when you are done. The False argument to acquire makes it non-blocking, and will just return False immediately is if can not acquire it (because main has not released it) –  DanielB Nov 25 '13 at 8:02
    
Example: gist.github.com/dbowring/d480fde90930184a4f44 –  DanielB Nov 25 '13 at 8:10

3 Answers 3

The field "running" is shared state, you need to guard it with some kind of monitor. In the absence of synchronizing access to this shared state, its visibility semantics are difficult to reason about and you'll get unexpected results.

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The main thread and the worker thread could run on cores that do not share cache. Because of the absence of synchronization, the write to t.running might never be shared from the main thread's cache to the worker thread's cache.

What synchronization means is not just "I want exclusive access". It also means, "I want to share my writes to other threads, and see the writes from other threads". No synchronization means that you do not need those things. Not synchronizing doesn't prevent them happening (and on some systems/architectures they will happen with more frequency than others), it just fails to guarantee they will happen.

In practice you might find that provided CPython is taking the GIL at regular intervals, these things sort themselves out even on architectures that, unlike Intel, do not have coherent caches.

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for your requirements use a threading.Event() object instead a flag.

class WorkerThread(threading.Thread):

    def __init__(self):
        super(WorkerThread, self).__init__()
        self.running = threading.Event()

    def run(self):
        self.running.set()
        while self.running.is_set():
            # .. do some important stuff
            pass
    def halt(self):
        self.running.clear()

def main():
    t = WorkerThread()
    t.start()

    # .. do other important stuff

    t.halt()
    t.join()

and for check if is running t.is_alive().

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