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Dear all,
In order to creation a formatted file, I want to utilize fprintf. it must get char* but I have several string variables. Can anyone help me, please?
Thanks

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Can you post some sample code showing us what is the input and what is the expected output? –  Naveen Jan 7 '10 at 7:01
    
I have something like this: ... string St1, St2; ... ifstream In("Text.txt"); In >> St1 >> St2; ... that St1 and St2 are initialized by reading from a file by ifstream() function. Now I want to write them in another file by fprintf() function. fprintf("%s %s", St1, St2); But I think fprint get char* not string. –  aryan Jan 7 '10 at 8:06
    
The first argument for fprintf should be a FILE*, not a char *. In C there's no "string", only "char *". Are you sure you didn't mean to tag this question with "c++" rather than "c" ? –  Remo.D Jan 7 '10 at 16:38
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The basic usage of fprintf with strings looks like this:

char *str1, *str2, *str3;
FILE *f;
// ...

f = fopen("abc.txt", "w");
fprintf(f, "%s, %s\n", str1, str2);
fprintf(f, "more: %s\n", str3);
fclose(f);

You can add several strings by using several %s format specifiers and you can use repeated calls to fprintf to write the file incrementally.

If you have C++ std::string objects you can use their c_str() method to get a const char* suitable to use with fprintf:

std::string str("abc");
fprintf(f, "%s\n", str.c_str());
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Thank you very much. It works. –  aryan Jan 13 '10 at 18:51
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fprintf with multiple strings is pretty simple, if that is what you are after, e.g.

const char* charString1 = "This";
const char* charString2 = "is a";
const char* charString3 = "test";

fprintf(fileHandle, "%s, %s, %s", charString1, charString2, charString3);
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I have something like this: ... string St1, St2; ... ifstream In("Text.txt"); In >> St1 >> St2; ... that St1 and St2 are initialized by reading from a file by ifstream() function. Now I want to write them in another file by fprintf() function. fprintf("%s %s", St1, St2); But I think fprint get char* not string. –  aryan Jan 7 '10 at 7:58
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fprintf works analogous to printf, in the format specifier, you can mention as many %s as you want and give the corresponding number of string arguments. If you want a more detailed answer, please post your code.

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