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I have this recursive function which traverses a binary tree and returns the value of the node when it gets to a node that is leaf but my program unexpectedly finishes at the return call. Here is my code:

string decodeFile(int cha, ibitstream& input, HuffmanNode* encodingTree, HuffmanNode*& root, string& result) {
  if(root->isLeaf()) {
    char value = root->character;
    string temp(1,value);
    cout << temp << endl;
    return temp;
  } else {
    if(cha == 0) root = root->zero;
    if(cha == 1) root = root->one;
    decodeFile(input.readBit(), input, encodingTree, root, result);
  }
}

so I console out to check what is happening and at that point it returns a value but when i go to the main function to cout it returns nothing.

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2  
It's surprising how common this error is. I'm not sure what it is about recursion that makes newbies think return is unnecessary. –  john Nov 25 '13 at 10:09
    
This code should not compile. Did you forget to switch on “treat warnings as errors”? –  Christopher Creutzig Nov 25 '13 at 10:10
    
i have never used that before. Why should it not compile? –  otch92 Nov 25 '13 at 10:11
    
@ChristopherCreutzig This code is required to compile, by the standard, unless the compiler can prove that regardless of the input, it will always be called at least once with !root->isLeaf() (and that input.readBit() returns). –  James Kanze Nov 25 '13 at 10:23
    
@otch92 Chris is saying that you should always pay attention to compiler warnings because they often indicate actual errors (as in this case) or at least bad coding style. The best way to do this is to turn on the 'treat warnings as errors' option. This way any code with warnings will not compile so you are forced to correct them. –  john Nov 25 '13 at 10:23

2 Answers 2

Well, you're not returning value from the recursive call to the caller:

string decodeFile(int cha, ibitstream& input, HuffmanNode* encodingTree, HuffmanNode*& root, string& result) {
if(root->isLeaf()) {
    char value = root->character;
    string temp(1,value);
    cout << temp << endl;
    return temp;
} else {
    if(cha == 0) root = root->zero;
    if(cha == 1) root = root->one;
    // do calculation and return result!
    return decodeFile(input.readBit(), input, encodingTree, root, result);
}

its a string type so i return the value as a string temp

Imagine that you're entering your code from main function and that you're going into else branch in the first call of decodeFile which will call decodeFile again:

main -> decodeFile -> decodeFile

Now, the second decodeFile is returning value with return temp, but the first decodeFile is not returning anything to the main function (as it is exiting after call to decodeFile):

main (NO RETURN)  decodeFile <- decodeFile

In order to avoid these kind of errors, listen Riot and add additional warning flags to your compiler.

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its a string type so i return the value as a string temp –  otch92 Nov 25 '13 at 10:09
    
@otch92 see my edit. –  Nemanja Boric Nov 25 '13 at 10:13

Your function is failing to return anything in the else portion of the branch.

If you're using gcc, you can get your compiler to warn you about such cases using the -Wreturn-type or -Wall options.

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