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I want to make a style for WPF treeview with the following rules:

  • The look of the tree has to be defined in the style;
  • The look of tree's items has to be defined in the style;
  • The look of tree item's contents (header) has to be defined in the style with option to be customized outside the style.

I've extracted TreeView's and TreeItem's default style and made some modifications. Currently, skeleton of my code looks like the following:

<Window.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeView}">
        <Style.Resources>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}">
            ...
            </Style>
        </Style.Resources>
    </Style>
</Window.Resources>

<Grid>
    <TreeView>
        <TreeViewItem Header="Root">
            <TreeViewItem header="Inner" />
        </TreeViewItem>
    </TreeView>
</Grid>

I've customized look of the expand button, to check, if everything's OK. The code presented above works as planned.

Correct styling

But then I want to customize the look of the TreeViewItems outside the style. I write:

<TreeView>
    <TreeView.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}">
            <Setter Property="HeaderTemplate">
                <Setter.Value>
                    ...
                </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>
        </Style>
    </TreeView.Resources>

    <TreeViewItem Header="Root">
        <TreeViewItem Header="Sub" />
    </TreeViewItem>
</TreeView>

The items are styled as I want, but the expander button returns to its default look.

Incorrect styling

How can I achieve a styling mechanism I want?

You can download the whole sample source.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand you correctly, you want to make a Style that is based on your default Style. If that is correct, then you can use the Style.BasedOn property if you provide your default Style with an x:Key value:

<Window.Resources>
    <Style x:Key="DefaultTreeViewStyle" TargetType="{x:Type TreeView}">
        <Style.Resources>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}">
            ...
            </Style>
        </Style.Resources>
    </Style>
</Window.Resources>

Then you can base your overriding Style on the default one like this:

<TreeView.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}" 
        BasedOn="{StaticResource DefaultTreeViewStyle}">
        <Setter Property="HeaderTemplate">
            <Setter.Value>
                ...
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>
</TreeView.Resources>

The new Style will have all of the settings from the default Style plus any additional settings that you provide here.

Actually, thinking about it a bit more, I think that you can base your overriding Style on the default one without setting the x:Key value on the default one like this:

<TreeView.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}" 
        BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type TreeViewItem}}">
        <Setter Property="HeaderTemplate">
            <Setter.Value>
                ...
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>
</TreeView.Resources>
share|improve this answer
    
It seem to work. But is there a way to achieve the same result without using BasedOn? I may modify the styles for the TreeView as well if needed. I may also create custom control based on TreeView, but I'm unsure, if that helps. –  Spook Nov 25 '13 at 13:24
    
What I want to say is, that if you use default style for TreeView and TreeViewItem, you don't have to use BasedOn to custom style items. I would like to apply style to TreeView in such way, that it would also be possible. –  Spook Nov 25 '13 at 13:24
    
Unfortunately, BasedOn is as good as it gets with customising existing Styles. –  Sheridan Nov 25 '13 at 13:27

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