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Why does a remain the same? Does append() generate a new slice?

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

var a = make([]int, 7, 8)

func Test(slice []int) {
    slice = append(slice, 100)

    fmt.Println(slice)
}

func main() {

    for i := 0; i < 7; i++ {
        a[i] = i
    }

    Test(a)

    fmt.Println(a)
}
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4 Answers 4

In your example the slice argument of the Test function receives a copy of the variable a in the caller's scope.

Since a slice variable holds a "slice descriptor" which merely references an underlying array, in your Test function you modify the slice descriptor held in the slice variable several times in a row, but this does not affect the caller and its a variable.

Inside the Test function, the first append reallocates the backing array under the slice variable, copies its original contents over, appends 100 to it, and that's what you're observing. Upon exiting from Test, the slice variable goes out of scope and so does the (new) underlying array that slice references.

If you want to make Test behave like append, you have to return the new slice from it — just like append does — and require the callers of Test to use it in the same way they would use append:

func Test(slice []int) []int {
    slice = append(slice, 100)

    fmt.Println(slice)

    return slice
}

a = Test(a)

Please read this article thoroughly as it basically shows you how to implement append by hand, after explaining how slices are working internally. Then read this.

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Typical append usage is

a = append(a, x)

because append may either modify its argument in-place or return a copy of its argument with an additional entry, depending on the size and capacity of its input. Using a slice that was previously appended to may give unexpected results, e.g.

a := []int{1,2,3}
a = append(a, 4)
fmt.Println(a)
append(a[:3], 5)
fmt.Println(a)

may print

[1 2 3 4]
[1 2 3 5]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, larsmans, I modified some code. "make" would give a enough capacity. The result is the same and I'm sill confused. –  Pole_Zhang Nov 25 '13 at 14:38
    
Tried it in Go playground. The codes didn't work. –  Gizak Nov 25 '13 at 16:47

NOTICE that append generates a new slice if cap is not sufficient. @kostix's answer is correct, or you can pass slice argument by pointer!

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You're correct about pointers but I have decidedly not mentioned them because the slices were invented mostly to free the programmers from dealing with pointers to arrays. In a reference implementation (from Go), a slice variable holds a pointer and two integers, so copying it is cheap and that's why slice = append(slice, a, b, c) is idiomatic, not passing a slice variable by pointer and modifying it "in place" so that the caller sees the change. –  kostix Nov 25 '13 at 17:15
    
@kostix You're right, the purpose of the codes should be explicit. But I think the whole story is just about passing a value storing a pointer and passing a pointer pointing to a pointer. If we modify the reference, both can work, but if we replace the reference, the first one loses effects. The programmer should know what he is doing. –  Gizak Nov 25 '13 at 18:17

Try this, I think it's clear, the underline array is changed but our slice not, print just print len() chars, by another slice to the cap(), you can see the changed array:

func main() {

for i := 0; i < 7; i++ {
    a[i] = i
}

Test(a)

fmt.Println(a) //prints [0..6]
fmt.Println(a[:cap(a)] //prints [0..6,100]
}
share|improve this answer
    
so 'a' and 'a[:cap(a)]' are different slice? –  Pole_Zhang Nov 27 '13 at 4:49
    
Yes,if you run the code you will find out that. because cap(a) is changed during the test(a) call –  doun Dec 9 '13 at 19:45

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