Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

My searching has been fruitless so far, so I suspect the answer is "no", but I'm new to Boost, so maybe I'm missing something.

Is there documentation for Boost libraries about exceptions the methods may throw? I can't find any docs on a general Boost policy about this, and of the parts I've looked at so far, many methods lack any docs about it.

My specific case is for boost::program_options::parse_command_line, which can throw invalid_command_line_syntax. This seems like reasonable behavior.

But: How was I supposed to know that might happen? I can't find this knowledge anywhere in the Boost docs or in the header files.

It looks like the only way is to search the web for usage examples and see what other people do (or try running it and see what happens).

Is there documentation on this?

share|improve this question

Here is the link to the list of program_options errors. You can also click on the link on all the errors to see how they work, also since boost is open source you can just go to the file and see exactly how it is implemented. boost is relatively well documented so i'm assuming every library has this documentation. Also read this link on boost's opinion on exception specification.

share|improve this answer
1  
-1 for "boost is relatively well documented". Boost's doc is terrible, it doesn't even have a search function (no, google search doesn't count). – inf Nov 25 '13 at 19:48
1  
@bamboon your seriously gonna downvote for that, it's an opinion, I've never found boost that hard to use and for such a big library it's not bad – aaronman Nov 25 '13 at 19:49
1  
Yes, I did, I don't feel that good about it, but calling boost doc "well documented" makes my brain hurt. – inf Nov 25 '13 at 19:52
1  
@g-makulik Haha, yeah right, because there is no navigation. – inf Nov 25 '13 at 19:53
2  
@aaronman Using the language's throw statement is one way to document the behavior. But not the only one. I'd personally prefer to use the language feature since it's available, but even in its absence it would help me to have the info in the human-readable docs. – Chris Nov 25 '13 at 20:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.