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I have code below which determines the version of Access. It runs quickly on most PCs. We also have four terminal servers. On two of the terminal servers it runs fine. On the other two, this code takes over 15 seconds to run.

All four terminal servers have Access 2003 runtime. I can't figure out why it would take longer to run on two servers. Would it be permissions? Or some mistake in the way the Access runtime was installed?

If there is a better, quicker way of determining the Version, I'd be interested in that too. Thanks Awesomo

   ' Determine the Access version by creating an
   ' Access.Application object and looking at
   ' its Version property.
   Private Function GetAccessVersionName() As String
      Dim obj As Object = CreateObject("Access.Application")
      Dim result As String = "Access.Application." & _
          obj.Version
      obj.Quit()
      Return result
   End Function

   ' Get the Access version number from the name.
   Private Function GetAccessVersionNumber() As Integer
      Dim txt As String = GetAccessVersionName()
      Dim pos2 As Integer = txt.LastIndexOf(".")
      Dim pos1 As Integer = txt.LastIndexOf(".", pos2 - 1)
      txt = txt.Substring(pos1 + 1, pos2 - pos1 - 1)
      Return CInt(txt)
   End Function

   ' Get the nice style of the Access version name.
   Public Function GetAccessVersionNiceName() As String

      Try
         Select Case GetAccessVersionNumber()
            Case 8
               Return "Access 97"
            Case 9
               Return "Access 2000"
            Case 10
               Return "Access XP" 
            Case 11
               Return "Access 2003"
            Case 12
               Return "Access 2007"
            Case Else
               Return "unknown"
         End Select
      Catch ex As Exception
         Return "unknown"
      End Try

   End Function
share|improve this question
1  
What version of Access? The installed version(s)? The current version registered to the MDB file?3 Or the version of Access of the format of a specific MDB/ACCDB/ADP file? Presumeabky you want the current version registered to the MDB file. I'd definitely use a registry key. Although, being a pessimist I'd be real tempted to double check that msaccess.exe exists in the location specified by the registry key. –  Tony Toews Jan 8 '10 at 3:02

4 Answers 4

I think the problem is the call to CreateObject(). This will run up Access which I guess can take 15 seconds on some machines. Here’s a alternative way to get the version number which should be a lot faster – it uses the information in the registery.

Imports Microsoft.Win32

Public Class AccessInterop
    Public Shared Function GetAccessVersionNiceName() As String
        Try
            Dim ClassName As String = GetAccessClassName()
            Select Case GetAccessVersionNumber(ClassName)
                Case 8
                    Return "Access 97"
                Case 9
                    Return "Access 2000"
                Case 10
                    Return "Access XP"
                Case 11
                    Return "Access 2003"
                Case 12
                    Return "Access 2007"
                Case 13
                    Return "Access 2010"
                Case Else
                    Return "unknown"
            End Select
        Catch ex As Exception
            Return "unknown"
        End Try
    End Function

    Private Shared Function GetAccessClassName() As String
        Dim RegKey As RegistryKey = Microsoft.Win32.Registry.ClassesRoot.OpenSubKey("Access.Application\CurVer")
        If RegKey Is Nothing Then
            Throw New ApplicationException("Can not find MS Access version number in registry")
        Else
            Return RegKey.GetValue("")
        End If
    End Function

    Public Shared Function GetAccessVersionNumber(ByVal ClassName As String) As Integer
        Dim VersionNumber As String = ClassName
        While VersionNumber.IndexOf(".") > -1
            VersionNumber = VersionNumber.Substring(VersionNumber.IndexOf(".") + 1)
        End While
        Return VersionNumber.Trim
    End Function
End Class
share|improve this answer
    
'Case 13' - I guess you mean 14? –  Fionnuala Aug 9 '10 at 9:40
    
Yeah. I'm sure it's 14. Microsoft skipped version 13. Check en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Office_2010#cite_ref-10 –  Alex Essilfie Aug 10 '10 at 13:24

This example returns a list of installed versions of Access quite quickly. There is no need to check further if only one is returned.

Const HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE = &H80000002&

Set fs = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")

strComputer = "."
Set objReg = GetObject("winmgmts:{impersonationLevel=impersonate}!\\" _
    & strComputer & "\root\default:StdRegProv")
strKeyPathOrg = "SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office"
strKeyPath = strKeyPathOrg
strValueName = "Path"

strKeyPath = strKeyPathOrg
objReg.EnumKey HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, strKeyPath, arrSubKeys

For Each subkey In arrSubKeys

    Select Case subkey
      Case "14.0"
      strKeyPath = strKeyPathOrg & "\" & subkey & "\Access\InstallRoot\"
      objReg.GetStringValue HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, strKeyPath, strValueName, strValue
      If Not IsNull(strValue) Then
            If fs.FileExists(strValue & "msaccess.exe") Then
               r = r & "Has Access 2010" & vbCrLf
            End If
      End If

      Case "12.0"
      strKeyPath = strKeyPathOrg & "\" & subkey & "\Access\InstallRoot\"
      objReg.GetStringValue HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, strKeyPath, strValueName, strValue
      If Not IsNull(strValue) Then
            If fs.FileExists(strValue & "msaccess.exe") Then
               r = r & "Has Access 2007" & vbCrLf
            End If
      End If

      Case "11.0"
      strKeyPath = strKeyPathOrg & "\" & subkey & "\Access\InstallRoot\"
      objReg.GetStringValue HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, strKeyPath, strValueName, strValue
      If Not IsNull(strValue) Then
            If fs.FileExists(strValue & "msaccess.exe") Then
               r = r & "Has Access 2003" & vbCrLf
            End If
      End If

      Case "10.0"
      strKeyPath = strKeyPathOrg & "\" & subkey & "\Access\InstallRoot\"
      objReg.GetStringValue HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, strKeyPath, strValueName, strValue
      If Not IsNull(strValue) Then
            If fs.FileExists(strValue & "msaccess.exe") Then
               r = r & "Has Access XP" & vbCrLf
            End If
      End If

      Case "9.0"
      strKeyPath = strKeyPathOrg & "\" & subkey & "\Access\InstallRoot\"
      objReg.GetStringValue HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, strKeyPath, strValueName, strValue
      If Not IsNull(strValue) Then
            If fs.FileExists(strValue & "msaccess.exe") Then
               r = r & "Has Access 2000" & vbCrLf
            End If
      End If

      Case "8.0"
      strKeyPath = strKeyPathOrg & "\" & subkey & "\Access\InstallRoot\"
      objReg.GetStringValue HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, strKeyPath, strValueName, strValue
      If Not IsNull(strValue) Then
            If fs.FileExists(strValue & "msaccess.exe") Then
               r = r & "Has Access 97" & vbCrLf
            End If
      End If
    End Select

Next

MsgBox r
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But it turns out I've just moved the delay! :) I changed my code to what you posted. But I still got a 15 second delay. I've narrowed it down to Dim oAccess As Access.Application Which is the same as what I had to check the version. I'm going to open Access at a particular form. So it seems as soon as I create an Access object- thats when the delay kicks in. And only on these two servers! Any other ideas? –  Awesomoprog Jan 7 '10 at 16:10
    
Sorry, at what point does the code above refer to an Access application? –  Fionnuala Jan 7 '10 at 17:35
    
@Remou: what happens when that code runs on a machine like my everyday laptop, which has 4 such subkeys on (8, 9, 11, 12), and they aren't in version order (or reverse version order -- they are ordered as 12, 11, 8, 9). The original code returns the version of Access that is currently registered as the Access.Application type in the registry, and there's only one at a time that can have that status. Depending on what needs to be accomplished, yours might be better (if you have a v11 database, you might want to see if v11 is available to open it, instead of using whatever is registered). –  David-W-Fenton Jan 8 '10 at 4:36
    
@DW Fenton As you can see from the code above, it returns a list of installed versions of Access quite quickly. There is no need to check further if only one is returned, which will often be the case. I have a similar list of subkeys and used it to check that this code runs as expected. It is not always wise to open an mdb on the registered version when more than one version is installed. –  Fionnuala Jan 8 '10 at 11:43
1  
I agree that it's not wise, but the code in the original question is determining the registered version. Who knows what he's going to do with it -- he may not be intending to then open a database with it at all. I think you would improve your answer by including your comment explanation within it and acknowleding that your solution does more than the original questioner's code. –  David-W-Fenton Jan 9 '10 at 0:47

This is a VERY long shot, but if you're running a compiled .NET app, make sure the machines you're running the app on have Internet access, because the .NET apps like to connect to Microsoft's website to validate.

share|improve this answer

This is how to obtain the installed Excel version.

Imports Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel
Public Class ExcelVersion
    Dim xl As Application
    Private Sub Command1_Click(ByVal eventSender As System.Object, ByVal eventArgs As System.EventArgs) Handlers NextCmd.Click
       xl = New Application
       MsgBox xl.Version()
       xl.Quit()
    End Sub
End Class
share|improve this answer

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