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Why won't this work? I want to compare two chars.

   //Login.
    char myName = 'name';

    //Login Temp.
    char nameTemp[10];

again:

    printf("Name?\t");
    scanf("%c", *nameTemp);



    if (strcmp(myName, nameTemp) == 0) {
        printf("Hej");
    }

    else { printf("Wrong. Try again"); goto again; }
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What does "won't work" mean? What do you expect to happen and what actually happens? –  Josh Caswell Nov 25 '13 at 19:50
3  
Believe me - you do not need goto –  Artur Nov 25 '13 at 19:52
    
It looks as if you are new to programming so I'd also like to point out this information about goto –  James Webster Nov 25 '13 at 19:55
1  
And this more pertinent information about goto –  James Webster Nov 25 '13 at 19:57
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change:

char myName = 'name';

to

const char *myName = "name";

You should have pointer to array of chars here instead of one char. Also change

scanf("%c", *nameTemp);

to

scanf("%s", nameTemp);

You should scan array of chars instead of one char.

And goto in this kind of program? Why in the world you didn't use plain while loop?

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const char *myName... –  user529758 Nov 25 '13 at 19:56
    
@H2CO3 thank you for pointing that out –  igoris Nov 25 '13 at 20:04
    
You're welcome. I thank you for including it. –  user529758 Nov 25 '13 at 20:16
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This line is wrong

char myName = 'name';

myName can only hold 1 character and you are trying to put a string in the variable. You need a null delimited char array instead.

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1  
Edited my answer! Thanks for the update! –  Rahul Tripathi Nov 25 '13 at 20:01
1  
@Rahul Sure :) Upvoted! –  Pepe Nov 25 '13 at 20:04
    
Thanks a lot Sir! –  Rahul Tripathi Nov 25 '13 at 20:05
    
That's not a string — it's a multicharacter literal. Weirdly, I don't think it will even warn you since those literals produce integers and truncating an integer into a char is not an error. –  Chuck Nov 25 '13 at 20:14
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I think you need to change

char myName = 'name';

to this:

char *myName = "name";

As myName can hold only a character and you are storing a string in that which is wrong.

Also change your scanf like this:

scanf("%s", nameTemp);

Note:-

char* is used to point to a simple array of character data values.

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1  
strings don't use ' –  crashmstr Nov 25 '13 at 19:55
    
@crashmstr:- Missed that. Thanks. Now updated my answer! But I guess I am too late now :( –  Rahul Tripathi Nov 25 '13 at 19:57
1  
I was not the down-voter...but I can up vote you now :) –  crashmstr Nov 25 '13 at 19:57
    
@crashmstr:- Thanks a lot Sir! –  Rahul Tripathi Nov 25 '13 at 19:58
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To declare a string in c you must declare a pointer of type char as follows

   char *myName="name";

and the name of the array is enough because it is a pointer

  scanf("%s", nameTemp);
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1  
Except for %c reading a char... –  crashmstr Nov 25 '13 at 19:58
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You don't seem to have a solid understanding of pointers and value types. For example:

char myName = 'name';

This is not at all what you're thinking. If you want this variable to hold a string, it should be of type char * rather than char. And the literal 'name' isn't the string "name" — single quotes signify character literals rather than string literals. A four-character character literal is a seldom-used and seldom-useful construct that combines all the characters into an integer — in this case, an integer holding the byte values of the characters 'n', 'a', 'm' and 'e'. (This used to be used frequently on the old Mac OS for file metadata. I'm not sure if it was ever commonly used anywhere else.)

Additionally, your reading code is incorrect:

scanf("%c", *nameTemp);

The format specifier "%c" looks for a single character rather than a string, and *nameTemp means "dereference the pointer nameTemp", which is not at all what you want to do here. Instead, you want the "%s" format specifier and just to pass nameTemp, since scanf wants a pointer.

The correct, idiomatic version of this code should look something like this:

//Login.
char myName = "name";

//Login Temp.
char nameTemp[10];

int matched = 0;

while (!matched) {
    printf("Name?\t");
    int readSucceeded = scanf("%9s", nameTemp);

    if (readSucceeded && strcmp(myName, nameTemp) == 0) {
        printf("Hej");
        break;
    }

    else {
        printf("Wrong. Try again");
    }
}

(Caveat: Written in browser and not tested, but hopefully you get the idea.)

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you have to change this

char myName = 'name';

to

char *myName = "name";

or

char myName[] = "name";
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