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I am having trouble manipulating an array in this Game of Life example code.

Situation:
"Game of life" is a cellular automation invented by John Conway. It consists of a grid of cells which can live/die/multiply based on mathematical rules. The live cells and dead cells in this grid are manipulated with the next() method, with nPals being the initial state of the grid.

Question:
My question - which is rather elementary, I know - is how do I use the next() method on nPals to give me the next stage?

Attempts:
My attempts so far lie along the lines of the following - both of which seem rather similar looking back.

  • nPals.next();
  • int newNPALS[][] = nPals.next(); // and then printing the array newNPALS

Any ideas would be most appreciated!

Code:

public class GameOfLife {
static int nPals[][] = {
    {0,0,0,0,0,0,0},
    {0,1,2,3,2,1,0},
    {0,2,102,104,102,2,0},
    {0,3,104,8,104,3,0},
    {0,2,102,104,102,2,0},
    {0,1,2,3,2,1,0},
    {0,0,0,0,0,0,0}
    };
public static void main(String[] args) {
    //Initial Stage
    System.out.println("   >>First Stage<<");
    printMatrix(nPals);
    //Second Stage
    System.out.println("\n   >>Second Stage<<");
    printMatrix(nPals);
}//end main

static Stack<Integer>stk=new Stack<Integer>();
static final int LIVE=100;
static final int MAXGRIDSIZE=1024;
public static void next(){
    for (int i=0;i<nPals.length;i++){
        for(int j=0;j<nPals[i].length;j++){
            switch(nPals[i][j]){
            case LIVE+0:case LIVE+1:case LIVE+4:
            case LIVE+5:case LIVE+6:case LIVE+7:
                stk.push(-(i*MAXGRIDSIZE+j));       //death
                nPals[i][j]-=LIVE;
                break;
            case 3:
                stk.push(i*MAXGRIDSIZE+j);          //life
                nPals[i][j]+=LIVE;
                break;
            }//end switch
        }//end for j
    }//end for i
    while(!stk.isEmpty()){
        int k=stk.pop();
        if(k>0)inc(k/MAXGRIDSIZE,k%MAXGRIDSIZE);
        else{
            k=-k;
            dec(k/MAXGRIDSIZE,k%MAXGRIDSIZE);
        }//end if 
    }//end while
}//end next

private static void inc(int i, int j) {

}

private static void dec(int i, int j){
    if(i!=0){
    //3 squares on top
        if(j!=0) minus(i-1,j-1);
        minus(i-1,j);
        if(j!=nPals[i].length-1)minus(i-1,j+1);
    }
    //2 on either side
    if(j!=0)minus(i,j-1);
    if(j!=nPals[i].length-1)minus(i,j+1);
    if(i!=nPals.length-1){
    //3 squares on bottom
        if(j!=0)minus(i+1,j-1);
        minus(i+1,j);
        if(j!=nPals[i].length-1)minus(i+1,j+1);
    }
}

private static void minus(int i, int j){
    if(nPals[i][j]>0)nPals[i][j]--;
}
private static void plus(int i, int j){
    if(nPals[i][j]<=0)nPals[i][j]++;
}

//This is just for explaining printMatrix above, otherwise immaterial
public static <E> void printMatrix(int[][] m){
    for(int[] rows:m){
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(rows));
    }
}//end printMatrix
}//end GameOfLife

Output:

   >>First Stage<<
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 1, 0]
[0, 2, 102, 104, 102, 2, 0]
[0, 3, 104, 8, 104, 3, 0]
[0, 2, 102, 104, 102, 2, 0]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 1, 0]
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

   >>Second Stage<< /* currently unchanged */
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 1, 0]
[0, 2, 102, 104, 102, 2, 0]
[0, 3, 104, 8, 104, 3, 0]
[0, 2, 102, 104, 102, 2, 0]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 1, 0]
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
share|improve this question
    
explain the game of life. Don't expect everyone to know how it works –  peeskillet Nov 25 '13 at 21:04
    
One common problem with GoL implementations is attempting to both update and use a single array for information on cell survival. Keep two arrays. BTW - it really seems you've reproduced your homework with a /* fill in code here */ instruction. SO does not work that way. –  Andrew Thompson Nov 25 '13 at 21:04
    
@AndrewThompson: I don't understand the second half of your comment. I wasn't trying to hide the fact that it's school work. I just didn't want to bombard users with code that might not necessarily be relevant. For future reference, what would be a better way of putting in code? –  kips15 Nov 25 '13 at 21:23
    
stackoverflow.com/about and sscce.org –  james.garriss Nov 25 '13 at 22:34
    
'I just didn't want to bombard users with code that might not necessarily be relevant." The code that is relevant is what you've tried. Show us what you tried. –  Andrew Thompson Dec 1 '13 at 9:22

2 Answers 2

You need to have a method that does something like:

public void doTurn(int [][]m) {

//manipulate matrix

}

And call that for each stage.

share|improve this answer

nPals is declared as a static array of array of ints (int[][]), this means that there is only one nPals in your class. The effect is that, within your class, you can always access it. So in your case just next() is the correct function call. Just use nPals when you need it in that function.

This makes me wonder though why you gave printMatrix an int[][] parameter..

Anyway, the full code of your main function:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    //Initial Stage
    System.out.println("   >>First Stage<<");
    printMatrix(nPals);

    next();

    //Second Stage
    System.out.println("\n   >>Second Stage<<");
    printMatrix(nPals);
}//end main
share|improve this answer

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