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<?php

$a=1;

?>
<?=$a;?>

What does <?= mean exactly?

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Side note: This is used extensively in ASP.NET MVC views. –  Omar Jan 7 '10 at 14:26
2  

8 Answers 8

up vote 38 down vote accepted

It's a shorthand for <?php echo $a; ?>.

This works only if the short_open_tag is enabled. There's by the way a rumour around that it's going to become deprecated in PHP6. It's enabled by default since 5.4.

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Is that story true? –  user198729 Jan 7 '10 at 13:24
2  
The rumour was around about a year ago IIRC. I recall that it was rebutted as not being true (just a misunderstanding/FUD). Alas I have no citation to back that up. –  Iain Collins Jan 7 '10 at 13:45
6  
I heard it too, but they will not be removed. Here is source: mail-archive.com/internals@lists.php.net/msg41845.html –  Gordon Jan 7 '10 at 13:48
6  
Flash forward. It's always on in >= 5.4 –  Ja͢ck Nov 16 '12 at 14:50

It's a shorthand for this:

<?php echo $a; ?>

They're called short tags; see example #2 in the documentation.

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6  
Please note that all servers do not support short tags as mentioned in an answer below. They require php.ini to have short_open_tag = On –  cballou Jan 7 '10 at 13:52

Since it wouldn't add any value to repeat that it means echo, I thought you'd like to see what means in PHP exactly:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => 368 // T_OPEN_TAG_WITH_ECHO
            [1] => <?=
            [2] => 1
        )
    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 309 // T_VARIABLE
            [1] => $a
            [2] => 1
        )
    [2] => ; // UNKNOWN (because it is optional (ignored))
    [3] => Array
        (
            [0] => 369 // T_CLOSE_TAG
            [1] => ?>
            [2] => 1
        )
)

You can use this code to test it yourself:

$tokens = token_get_all('<?=$a;?>');
print_r($tokens);
foreach($tokens as $token){
    echo token_name((int) $token[0]), PHP_EOL;
}

From the List of Parser Tokens, here is what T_OPEN_TAG_WITH_ECHO links to.

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The token failed to tell me more details. –  user198729 Jan 7 '10 at 14:14
<?=$a; ?>

is a shortcut for:

<?php echo $a; ?>
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<?= $a ?> is the same as <? echo $a; ?>, just shorthand for convenience.

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It's a shortcut for <?php echo $a; ?> if short_open_tags are enabled. Ref: http://php.net/manual/en/ini.core.php

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I hope it doesn't get deprecated. While writing <? blah code ?> is fairly unnecessary and confusable with XHTML, <?= isn't, for obvious reasons. Unfortunately I don't use it, because short_open_tag seems to be disabled more and more.

Update: I do use <?= again now, because it is enabled by default with PHP 5.3.x.

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1  
...? The sentence seems as if its incomplete and there is miss –  glglgl May 3 '12 at 14:44
    
Ah, indeed. I've fixed that now. –  antihero Jun 7 '12 at 11:05

Try searching for symbols on SymbolHound: the search engine for programmers. Here are the results for your query.

Hope that's useful! -Tom (SH cofounder)

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