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Give this class:

public class ClassToTest
{
    private IService _service;

    public ClassToTest(IService service)
    {
        _service = service;
    }   

    public Output MethodToTest(string input)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
            throw new ArgumentNullException("input");

        var output = new Output();

        if (input == "Yes")
            output.Value = "X";
        else
            output.Value = "Y";

        _service.AnotherMethod(input);
        return output;
    }
}

Should I assert that _service.AnotherMethod(input) is called in every unit test for this method as I do below or just test it in one method?

// Test #1
[Test]
public void ThrowsExceptionForEmptyInput()
{
    // Arrange
    var service = new Mock<IService>();
    var classToTest = new ClassToTest(service.Object);

    // Act
    var result = () => classToTest.MethodToTest("");

    // Assert
    result.ShouldThrow<ArgumentNullException>();
}



// Test #2
[Test]
public void ReturnsXForYesAndCallsAnotherMethod()
{
    // Arrange
    string input = "Yes";
    var service = new Mock<IService>();
    var classToTest = new ClassToTest(service.Object);

    // Act
    var result = classToTest.MethodToTest(input);

    // Assert
    Assert.Equals("X", result.Value);
    service.Verify(m => m.AnotherMethod(input), Times.Once());
}

// Test #3
[Test]
public void ReturnsYForAnyValueAndCallsAnotherMethod()
{
    // Arrange
    string input = "Other Value Not Yes";
    var service = new Mock<IService>();
    var classToTest = new ClassToTest(service.Object);

    // Act
    var result = classToTest.MethodToTest(input);

    // Assert
    Assert.Equals("X", result.Value);
    service.Verify(m => m.AnotherMethod(input), Times.Once());
}
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I suggest you assert _service.AnotherMethod(input) only once. That will make only one test fail if the service is not called and you will know the source of the problem. Otherwise you will have a bunch of failed tests, and you will have to search for the source of failure.

In a perfect world, you should have many tests with single assertions giving you only one reason to fail for each test.

share|improve this answer
    
What value should I use for input when testing the method? Yes or anything else? What if someone codes a return output; in the Yes if statement? Then if I use something else as input for the test that check _service.AnotherMethod(input) is called, I won't get any failing tests. – Omar Nov 25 '13 at 22:54
1  
It does not matter what value of input will be used when testing _service.AnotherMethod(input) because logic of your method tells, that it only should be same value which you passed to method (I usually use random values for such tests). You should not think about 'what if someone codes return somewhere?'. What if someone removes method body? What if someone will throw exception? If someone will decide to change behavior of your method, then he should write appropriate tests for new behavior. You should not write such tests before. – Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 25 '13 at 22:59
    
Do you recommend that I create single separate test that ensures that the method is called or include it as part of one of a single other test? What would be a good naming convention if I was to create a separate test for it? – Omar Nov 28 '13 at 20:47
1  
@Omar you should use your domain language in unit tests (that will make not make them obsolete if you will rename some method, or extract some dependency). E.g. test for _service.AnotherMethod call could have name ShouldNotifyCustomer and other test, which do not verifies this call, can have name ShouldDepositMoney – Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 29 '13 at 6:23

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