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I've got an application that builds a bar chart using svg, and I want to download a PNG image to the user. I'm using the FileSaver.js and canvas-to-blob.min.js polyfills to get support for canvas.toBlob() and window.saveAs().

Here's the snippet of code attached to the download button:

$('#download-button').on('click', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    var chart = $('#bar-chart')
        .attr('xmlns', 'http://www.w3.org/2000/svg');
    var width = chart.width();
    var height = chart.height();
    var data = new XMLSerializer().serializeToString(chart.get(0));
    var svg = new Blob([data], { type: "image/svg+xml;charset=utf-8" });
    var url = URL.createObjectURL(svg);

    var img = $('<img />')
        .width(width)
        .height(height)
        .on('load', function() {
            var canvas = document.createElement('canvas');
            canvas.width = width;
            canvas.height = height;
            var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');
            ctx.drawImage(img.get(0), 0, 0);
            canvas.toBlob(function(blob) {
                saveAs(blob, "test.png");
            });
        });
    img.attr('src', url);
});

It extracts out the XML for the SVG image, wraps it in a blob and creates and object URL for the blob. Then it creates an image object and sets its src to the object URL. The load event handler then creates a canvas and uses drawImage() to render the image onto the canvas. Finally, it extracts the image data to a second blob and uses saveAs() to download it as "test.png".

Everything appears to work, but the downloaded PNG file doesn't have the whole image -- just a piece of the upper left corner. Could the browser be firing the "load" event before the SVG has been fully rendered? Or am I just missing something here?

Here is a jsFiddle demonstrating the problem.

share|improve this question
    
The 100% width of the SVG element is interpreted as 100 pixels. You can see this if you console.log the width/height. Setting absolute width is one way to solve the problem. –  K3N Nov 26 '13 at 7:41
    
Thanks, Ken -- that did it. –  scottb Dec 12 '13 at 23:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(Moving comment to answer so question can be closed:)

The 100% width of the SVG element is interpreted as 100 pixels. You can see this if you console.log the width/height.

Setting absolute width is one way to solve the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Not to be confused with the height and width in the style attribute of the element. Setting the height and width attributes of the element is the trick. Example: <svg height="500" width="500" > ... </svg> –  Nikhil Girraj Nov 4 '14 at 8:01

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