Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am currently working on hash tables and am alittle confused on double hashing. Let me first start with what the information I was given.

You first make an array which will hold all the data and they are sorted by keys. I used the formula K % size to find the position in the array that the key will go. If you submit a key into a spot where there is already a key its called a collision. Here is where the double comes in. I use the formula max(1,(K/size) % size) to get a number which will decrement from that position.

So I came up with these functions:

int hashing(table_t *hash, hashkey_t K)
{
    int item;
    item = K % hash->size;
    return item;
}

int double_hashing(table_t *hash, hashkey_t K)
{
    int item;
    item = K/hash->size % hash->size);
    return item;
}



//This is part of another function which involves the double.
else if(hash->probing_type == 2)
{
   int dec, item;
   item = hashing(hash,K);
   if(hash->table[item] == NULL)
   {
        hash->table[item]->K == K;
        hash->table[item]->I == I;
   }
   else
   {
        dec = double_hashing(hash,K);
        hash->table[item-dec]->K == K;
        hash->table[item-dec]->I == I;
   }

}

So I use the two formulas to move the keys around. Now I am confused to what happens if I decrement and land on another spot in which a key is already placed. Do I decrement again by that much until I find a place?

share|improve this question

Now I am confused to what happens if I decrement and land on another spot in which a key is already placed. Do I decrement again by that much until I find a place?

Yes. Provided your hash table size is prime and the table is not full, you will eventually find a free space for your new entry.

You don't just check if the entry is NULL. You need to also check that it doesn't contain the same key that is being inserted. Storing the key in a hash table is essential, so you can be sure that the key you searched on is the key you found.

Beware of modifying your table index without forcing it to be in the array bounds. For example, if item was 0 and then you subtract 1, you will have an out-of-bounds index.

You can correct this like so:

item = (item - dec + hash->size) % hash->size;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the comment! So would I make a while loop to keep subtracting the value? And the line you provided keeps it from going out of bounds? – user081608 Nov 26 '13 at 4:08
    
Yep. To be safe, you might want to save the original index and loop until you either hit it again or you find a free slot. – paddy Nov 26 '13 at 4:16
    
Okay thank you it all makes sense! – user081608 Nov 26 '13 at 4:25
    
accept answer if that help you. – moeCake Nov 26 '13 at 5:18
    
Where would I add the line in the bottom of your answer? Would that go in the while loop? – user081608 Nov 26 '13 at 7:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.