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Is it be possible to use some sort of @directive creation syntax, similar to creating @mixins? Secondly, is it possible to create a SASS-only pseudo class?

I'd like to declare my own SASS directive,although I'd prefer not to have to force my teammates to install an extra ruby gem to use it so I'd want to store it in a scss partial. I do understand that they are orders of levels in complexity, so perhaps it just isn't possible.

In addition to perhaps creating a new scss-only pseudo class (such as :parent, :clicked, :unchecked, etc) I'd be interested in a custom-made directive that assists with using checkboxes to direct css animations ("css checkbox hack"). Here is my scss pseudocode to generalize what I'm trying to do:

//  this code monitors when a checkbox (#someinput) is checked,
//  then applies style to div #target div.  Basically an 'onClick' event in scss.
body {
  #wrapper {
    #targetdiv {
      @spotcheck(#someinput) {                 #
        color: red; border: 2px solid blue;    # <-- move this ...
      }                                        #

      color: blue; border: 0;
      #someinput {
        width: 20px; height: 20px;
      }
    }
  }
}

// ... the above scss should be converted to this pre-compiled state, also scss
body {
  #someinput:checked ~ #targetdiv {           #
    color: red; border: 2px solid blue;       # <-- ..to here. it needs to be 
  }                                           #       above the #targetdiv

  #wrapper {
    #targetdiv {
      color: blue; border: 0;
      #someinput {
        width: 20px; height: 20px;
      }
    }
  }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Make your selectors only as specific as they absolutely need to be and no more. A mixin would only be more verbose with no real benefit.

#targetdiv {
    color: blue; border: 0;

    #someinput:checked ~ & {
        color: red; border: 2px solid blue;
    }
}

#someinput {
    width: 20px; height: 20px;
}

Output:

#targetdiv {
  color: blue;
  border: 0;
}
#someinput:checked ~ #targetdiv {
  color: red;
  border: 2px solid blue;
}

#someinput {
  width: 20px;
  height: 20px;
}

Alternately, this would give the same result with the ability to overqualify as much as you want:

#targetdiv {
    color: blue; border: 0;
}

#someinput {
    width: 20px; height: 20px;

    ~ #targetdiv {
        color: red; border: 2px solid blue;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is that actual Sass syntax, with the '&' referring to the parent element?: #someinput:checked ~ & –  Gavin Nov 26 '13 at 18:33
    
Yes, plain Sass (scss). –  cimmanon Nov 26 '13 at 18:51
    
I didn't know that existed, thanks. By the way, do you have thoughts on the main question posed, which concerns a way to create a '@directive' or pseudo class, perhaps in an imported scss file (instead of ruby)? –  Gavin Nov 26 '13 at 20:59
    
My opinion doesn't matter a whole lot, but the maintainers of Sass are hesitant to add new directives unless there are solid use cases for them. If I were to guess, I would say that this probably would not be one of those cases. –  cimmanon Nov 26 '13 at 21:09
    
I was surprised to see the & at the end of the line. The reason why is because it doesn't work. It needs to appear at the start, unfortuantely. It would be great if it did, though. –  Gavin Dec 10 '13 at 20:29

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