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I want to construct a stack implemented in PHP. Initially I have this code:

class Stack
{
    protected $stack;
    protected $limit;

    public function __construct($limit = 10) {
        // initialize the stack
        $this->stack = array();
        // stack can only contain this many items
        $this->limit = $limit;
    }

    public function push($item) {
        // trap for stack overflow
        if (count($this->stack) < $this->limit) {
            // prepend item to the start of the array
            array_unshift($this->stack, $item);
        } else {
            throw new RunTimeException('Stack is full!');
        }
    }

    public function pop() {
        if ($this->isEmpty()) {
            // trap for stack underflow
          throw new RunTimeException('Stack is empty!');
      } else {
            // pop item from the start of the array
            return array_shift($this->stack);
        }
    }

    public function top() {
        return current($this->stack);
    }

    public function isEmpty() {
        return empty($this->stack);
    }
}

And initialize the class normally using this:

$stack = new Stack();
$stack->push(1);
$stack->push(2);
$stack->push(3);
$stack->push(4);
$stack->push(5);

This is correct and running. However, I want to initialize my stack with an initial value like this:

$stack = new Stack(array(1,2,3,4,5));

How can I implement this?


Note that all other functions (e.g pop and push) are functional.

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1  
Just FYI, PHP has array_push (php.net/manual/en/function.array-push.php) and array_pop (us3.php.net/array_pop) implementations. –  Adeel Hasan Akbari Nov 26 '13 at 6:58
    
sidenote: the $stack and $limit can be private –  Raptor Nov 26 '13 at 7:00
    
Yes but it looks more neat if you have those right? –  Christian Mark Nov 26 '13 at 7:05
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's the implementation of the correct stack class. To correctly initialize array to the value of a stack, you have to reverse the values of that array like this:

class Stack
{
    protected $stack;
    protected $limit;

    public function __construct($values = array(),$limit = 10) {
        // initialize the stack
        $this->stack = array_reverse($values);
        // stack can only contain this many items
        $this->limit = $limit;
    }

    public function push($item) {
        // trap for stack overflow
        if (count($this->stack) < $this->limit) {
            // prepend item to the start of the array
            array_unshift($this->stack, $item);
        } else {
            throw new RunTimeException('Stack is full!');
        }
    }

    public function pop() {
        if ($this->isEmpty()) {
            // trap for stack underflow
          throw new RunTimeException('Stack is empty!');
      } else {
            // pop item from the start of the array
            return array_shift($this->stack);
        }
    }

    public function top() {
        return current($this->stack);
    }

    public function isEmpty() {
        return empty($this->stack);
    }
}

Happy coding!

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Change your constructor as follows:

<?php

class Stack {

    protected $stack;
    protected $limit;

    public function __construct($limit = 10, $initial = array()) {
        // initialize the stack
        $this->stack = $initial;
        // stack can only contain this many items
        $this->limit = $limit;
    }

    public function push($item) {
        // trap for stack overflow
        if (count($this->stack) < $this->limit) {
            // prepend item to the start of the array
            array_unshift($this->stack, $item);
        } else {
            throw new RunTimeException('Stack is full!');
        }
    }

    public function pop() {
        if ($this->isEmpty()) {
            // trap for stack underflow
            throw new RunTimeException('Stack is empty!');
        } else {
            // pop item from the start of the array
            return array_shift($this->stack);
        }
    }

    public function top() {
        return current($this->stack);
    }

    public function isEmpty() {
        return empty($this->stack);
    }

}

/**
 * This'll work as expected.
 */
$stack = new Stack();
$stack->push(1);
$stack->push(2);
$stack->push(3);
$stack->push(4);
$stack->push(5);

/**
 * And this too.
 */
$stack = new Stack(10, array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5));

Just FYI, PHP has array_push (http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-push.php) and array_pop (http://us3.php.net/array_pop) implementations.

share|improve this answer
    
sidenote: it is HIGHLY recommended to validate the input parameters in constructor (check its type at least). –  Raptor Nov 26 '13 at 7:03
add comment

Simple, change your constructor:

public function __construct($limit = 10, $values = array()) {
    // initialize the stack
    $this->stack = $values;
    // stack can only contain this many items
    $this->limit = $limit;
}
share|improve this answer
    
prepare to have a popular answer sir!.=) –  Christian Mark Nov 26 '13 at 6:55
    
This is incorrect. However I got the idea. –  Christian Mark Nov 26 '13 at 6:57
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Change the constructor to this. With this, you can supply no value, or a single value, or multiple values in an array. It will throw an error if the values count larger than the limit.

    public function __construct($limit = 10, $values = null) {
        // stack can only contain this many items
        $this->limit = $limit;
        // initialize the stack
        $this->stack = array();
        if (is_null($values)) $values = array();
        else if (!is_array($values)) $values = array($values);
        foreach ($values as $value) $this->push($value);
    }

There, hope it helps.

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