Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While,in the Java code below,how can the unSaved attribute in every instance of class TestRef to hold the newest unSaved object?

I tried it, the unSaved attribute of every instance of class TestRef hold the unSaved which call the setUnSaved() set to it, but I want to achieve it hold the newest unSaved (that is the newest TestRef object).

package com.test.ref;
public class TestRef
{
    private TestRef unSaved;
    private String name;

    public  TestRef(String name)
        {
           this.name = name;
        }

    public String getName(){
    return name;
    }

        public TestRef getUnSaved()
    {
         return unSaved;
    }

    public void setUnSaved(TestRef unSaved)
    {
    this.unSaved = unSaved;
    }

    public void save()
    {
    System.out.println("save Finished");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
    TestRef unSaved = null;
    TestRef obj1 = new TestRef("obj1");
    unSaved = obj1;
    obj1.setUnSaved(unSaved);
    TestRef obj2 = new TestRef("obj2");
    unSaved = obj2;

               //the unSaved in the obj1 is not reference to the newest obj(that is obj2),How Can I achieve it? 
    System.out.println(obj1.unSaved.getName());
    System.out.println(unSaved.getName());          
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Thanks for your editing. –  tao4yu Nov 26 '13 at 7:56

2 Answers 2

This whole question is solved by making use of static variables (class variables). Why keep a reference to the same object in every object instance. Just store this reference as a class variable and be happy. To do this, you would have to do two things:

  1. make the constructor private to control who is creating those objects.

  2. Save the latest created instance in a static member variable (and potentially synchronizing the method if you think about a multi threaded environment).

With that you always keep a reference to the latest created object. Adapting your code example you should have something like this:

package com.test.ref;

public class TestRef {
  private static TestRef unSaved;

  private String name;

  private TestRef(String name) {
    this.name = name;
    TestRef.unSaved = this;
  }

  public String getName() {
    return this.name;
  }

  public static TestRef getUnSaved() {
    return unSaved;
  }

  public void save() {
    System.out.println("save Finished");
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    TestRef obj1 = new TestRef("obj1");
    TestRef obj2 = new TestRef("obj2");
    System.out.println(TestRef.unSaved.getName());
    System.out.println(obj1.getName());
    System.out.println(obj2.getName());
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it helps –  tao4yu Nov 26 '13 at 7:27
    
You are welcome. Please read up on this tutorial here, it is well written and a good starting point for fully understanding these things: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/classvars.html –  Matthias Nov 26 '13 at 7:30

This problem is only about designing a solution according to your requirements. You can find many different ways for implemantation.

Here is an example. But you should know that may not a good design...

package com.test.ref;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class TestRef {

    // TO ACCESS ALL INSTANCES OF TEST REF FOR UPDATE LATEST UNSAVED OBJECT REFENRECE
    private static List<TestRef> myObjList = new ArrayList<TestRef>();

    private TestRef unSaved;

    private String name;

    // GET OBJECT LIST TO CONSTRUCTOR
    public TestRef(String name, List<TestRef> myObjList) {
        this.name = name;

        // UPDATE ALL REFERENCES
        myObjList.add(this);
        for(TestRef myObj : myObjList)
        {
            myObj.setUnSaved(this);
        }
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public TestRef getUnSaved() {
        return unSaved;
    }

    public void setUnSaved(TestRef unSaved) {
        this.unSaved = unSaved;
    }

    public void save() {
        System.out.println("save Finished");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TestRef unSaved = null;

        TestRef obj1 = new TestRef("obj1", myObjList);

        unSaved = obj1;

        obj1.setUnSaved(unSaved);

        TestRef obj2 = new TestRef("obj2", myObjList);

        unSaved = obj2;

        // the unSaved in the obj1 is not reference to the newest obj(that is
        // obj2),How Can I achieve it?
        System.out.println(obj1.unSaved.getName());

        System.out.println(unSaved.getName());
    }
}

As I mentioned, this is not perfect solution. You can read about Singelton or other design patterns to get more idea.

share|improve this answer
    
This solution is bad. Keeping a whole list of objects is introducing a potential memory leak since those references will not be cleaned. Additionally if you keep the references as a private static variable, why do you have to pass it to the public constructor? The object already has access to its static members, the classes using your TestRef class, don't. And what is the point of setting every possible instance to the same new object? –  Matthias Nov 26 '13 at 7:59
    
@user3035281,there is no syntax error in your code.You have used Observer Pattern.But, just like Matthias says, the solution is not so well. –  tao4yu Nov 26 '13 at 8:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.