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There is a StoreService in the project, which provides some methods to read from and write to a remote data store. e.g.

public class StoreService {
    public StoreService(String url, String username, String password) {}
    public void save(String category, String key, String value) {}
    public String read(String category, String key) {}
}

Then I see there is another UserStoreService which is in a sub-module of the project, which extends StoreService:

public class UserStoreService extends StoreService {
    public UserStoreService(String url, String username, String password) {
        super(url, username, password);
    }
    public void saveUserName(String userId, String userName) {
        super.save("user", userId, userName);
    }
    public void getUserName(String userId, String userName) {
        return super.read("user", userId);
    }
}

You can see it just add some methods. Is it good to use extends here?

I can make it without extends:

public class UserStoreService {
    private StoreService storeService;
    public UserStoreService(String url, String username, String password) {
        this.storeService = new StoreService(url, username, password);
    }
    public void saveUserName(String userId, String userName) {
        storeService.save("user", userId, userName);
    }
    public void getUserName(String userId, String userName) {
        return storeService.read("user", userId);
    }
}

But I'm not sure which solution is better, and when should I use extends and when not.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This really depends on your requirements-- there is no intrinsic 'better or worse' in these scenarios.

Off the top of my head, here are some considerations:

Advantages of inheritance (first scenario):

  1. You can easily use your new subclass in place of the original one.
  2. New methods in the superclass get inherited automatically, maintaining functionality and compatibility.
  3. Method calls don't need to follow an additional pointer, so this can be slightly faster.

Advantages of delegation (second scenario):

  1. You can easily switch the delegate object as needed.
  2. New methods in the superclass don't get inherited automatically, so you'll get errors that warn you of missing functionality in the subclass.
  3. New methods in the superclass don't get inherited automatically, so you can avoid supporting functionality that you don't want to support.

For delegation in this scenario, you can also consider having a common super-interface, which will often give you the best of both worlds.

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As I see from your code you have completelly different interface for UserStoreService against StoreService. So this is right way do not use inheritance (extends) but use composition.

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Use inheritance when you feel that there is some polymorphic behavior that can be extracted and there really exists an is-a relationship among the subclass and superclass.

Otherwise in most situations prefer composition over inheritance as it also limits the possibility of UserStoreService to be able to extend some other class in future.

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Mainly we use extends keywords to provide inheritance and code re usability for development perspective. here is one example for that which demonstrate the actual use of extends keyword in java

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Code reusability should not be a reason to extend a class. –  Kayaman Nov 26 '13 at 7:26

The second one is clearly better. The first one uses inheritance to reuse code, and not as a way to do polymorphism. The UserStoreService, which is supposed to handle users, can in fact store any other kind of category, because the superclass methods are still exposed.

Such a design leads to atrocities like java.util.Properties, which is supposed to only contain Strings as keys and values, but which can't enforce this because it extends from Hashtable instead of using one.

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Can you please elaborate on The UserStoreService, which is supposed to handle users, can in fact store any other kind of category, because the superclass methods are still exposed ? –  Yaneeve Nov 26 '13 at 7:44
1  
The subclass adds methods to the superclass, but the superclass methods still exist, so nothing prevents a developer from doing UserStoreService userStore = new UserStoreService(...); userStore.save("toy", "lego", "yellow");. So the UserStoreService can be used to store toys, or any other category, which is wrong. –  JB Nizet Nov 26 '13 at 7:56

I Agree with @Narendra Pathai's answer but would like to recommend that you always prefer composition to inheritance unless you already have within your code a situation where accessing some object polymorphically would make more sense - say lets draw all those shapes and not to pre-code polymorphic (is-a relationships) for some unknown future case.

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