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I thought these questions were straightforward, until i realised that the instance of TableOrder that it is refering to consists of two properties (one food and one drink).

  1. On initialisation, an instance of TableBill will accept one of two sets of parameters: a. The table number for which this bill refers to. OR b. The table number and the order that has already been placed for that table.
  2. Note that the initialisation options leaves room for a bill instance to be created that does not yet carry the order for this table. Provide a property called Order that will allow the instance of TableOrder to be stored and retrieved.

So my question is, does this mean that i need to store both properties, or do I create a new property for TableOrder? (i doubt the latter as the class is called TableOrder.

I have been awake for 24 hours now im struggling to understand the questions.

any help would be greatly appreciated.

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Have you learnt about constructors? –  rhughes Nov 26 '13 at 7:31
    
@rhughes yes I have, that did cross my mind earlier but as the question didnt use the term i assumed there had to be another way? –  willemorley Nov 26 '13 at 7:36

2 Answers 2

public class TableBill
{
    // the first way of initializing - by just passing the table number
    public TableBill(int tableNumber)
    {
        this.TableNumber = tableNumber;
    }

    // second option will use the first constructor to set table number (the ':this()' line)
    // and then set the order
    public TableBill(int tableNumber, TableOrder order)
        : this(tableNumber)
    {
        this.Order = order;
    }

    // the table number property has a private setter, so it will only be set 
    // from the constructors.
    public int TableNumber { get; private set; }

    // a completely public property for setting the order
    public TableOrder Order { get; set; }
}

You also have an option of merging the two constructors into one by using optional parameter:

public TableBill(int tableNumber, TableOrder order = null)
{
    this.TableNumber = tableNumber;
    this.Order = order;
}
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this is very similar to what i had earlier (the first section). but for some reason it is telling me that 'TableNumber' cannot be found? any thoughts –  willemorley Nov 26 '13 at 7:48

When the first question speaks about On initialisation, it probably means using a constructor.

Your class could be like this:

public class TableBill
{
    public Order Order
    {
        get
        {
            return this._order;
        }
        set
        {
            this._order = value;
        }
    }
    private Order _order = null;

    public TableBill(int tableNumber)
    {
        // ...
    }

    public TableBill(int tableNumber, Order order)
    {
        // check for nulls etc...

        // ...
        this.Order = order;
    }
}
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