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I'm using an NSSortDescriptor to sort NSDate objects in an ascending order. However, I need nil dates to be at the bottom of the list, whereas at the moment they come at the top.

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3 Answers 3

Of course, I should use

initWithKey:ascending:selector:

and write my own comparison selector

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Exactly. Do you custom logic to handle nil values and then call [myNSDateInstance compare:secondDate]; if second date is non nil. –  Corey Floyd Jan 7 '10 at 17:40
    
That won't help, since compare: will be sent to the NSDate instances; if nil ends up the receiver, the result will be NSOrderedSame, and if the receiver is not nil but the argument is, I don't think any specific result is guaranteed. –  Peter Hosey Jan 7 '10 at 18:07
up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the end I have decided that having nil values is not a good idea and if I want what were nil value to appear at the bottom of the ascending list I should set the dates to [NSDate distantFuture] and them check for this before displaying them. It turns out this makes more semantic sense in within the applications as well.

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Looks like you already have a solution, but for anyone else looking to still use nil NSDates, and have them at the bottom, I use the following code where I sort descending, and then reverse the order of the objects sent to the compare.

_sortDescriptor = [NSSortDescriptor sortDescriptorWithKey:@"dueDate"
                                                ascending:NO
                                               comparator:^NSComparisonResult(id obj1, id obj2)  {
                                                   return [obj2 compare:obj1];
                                               }];
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