Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
C# constructor execution order

class Foo
{
    public int abc;
    Foo()
    {
       abc = 3;
    }

}

class Bar : Foo
{
    Bar() : base()
    {
       abc = 2;
    }
}

In the example above, when an object of Bar is created, what will be the value of BarObject.abc? Is the base constructor called first, or is Bar() run, /then/ the base() constructor?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jeff Sternal, ChrisF, mgroves, Brian, BFree Jan 7 '10 at 16:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Bad practice to have member variables become public. You may want to pick up a good book on beginning C# objects. –  JonH Jan 7 '10 at 15:36
3  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1882692/…, with a terrific accepted answer and comments linking Eric Lippert blog entries no less. –  Jeff Sternal Jan 7 '10 at 15:41

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It'll be 2. Constructors run in order from base class first to inherited class last.

Note that initialisers (both static and instance variables) run in the opposite direction.

The full sequence is here: http://www.csharp411.com/c-object-initialization/

share|improve this answer

First base class constructor is called followed by the derived class constructor. The result is 2. You should explicitly state the accessibility of that class variable. Is it protected, private or public?

I see you changed it to public now, so it will be 2.

This link will further help you understand constructors, how they are used, when they are called, and order of constructor call when you use inheritance:

http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/constructors.html

Also you may want to actually try this out yourself, you will learn more by practicing and writing code then just reading it.

Try to declare Bar and output its value. Use some properties:

 class Foo
    {
        public int abc;
        public Foo()
        {
            abc = 3;
        }

        public int ABC
        {
            get { return abc; }
            set { abc = value; }
        }

    }

    class Bar : Foo
    {
        public Bar() : base()
        {
            abc = 2;
        }
    } 


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Bar b = new Bar();
            Console.WriteLine(b.ABC);
            Console.ReadLine();

        }
    }

A simple printout would yield the result you are looking for. Here is the output:

alt text

Don't you just love my namespace :-). By the way you could also use automatic properties so that the property is simply public int ABC {get;set;}.

share|improve this answer

Assuming you make abc protected so that this compiles, it will be 2; however, base() is called first.

For stuff like this, write a simple test application and setup some breakpoints to find the answer.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for suggesting writing simple tests –  ChrisF Jan 7 '10 at 15:41

The base constuctor is called first, and you would have a value of 2 for abc

share|improve this answer

The base constructor will be called first, but this code does not compile. Private fields are not accesable from sub-classes. At the very least a field must be protected to be used in a sub-class.

But even knowing this, the behaviour you are attempting is confusing because it is surprising. Just the fact you had to ask which order things go in implies that it will get messed up when the order is forgotten.

share|improve this answer

The variable abc will be set to be 3 and then changed to be 2 (the base constructor is called first).

share|improve this answer
    
Errr, abc is public –  alastairs Jan 7 '10 at 15:33
1  
It wasn't when he first posted the question. I have removed it to accommodate his update. –  Kevin Jan 7 '10 at 15:34
    
alastairs it wasnt public when he posted it. –  JonH Jan 7 '10 at 15:36
    
This has been edited, it originally had no scope declared (and so was private). –  Chris Pitman Jan 7 '10 at 15:36

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.