Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've tried to random 20 numbers with different output, but it still contains same numbers. Here's the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

void main(){
    int arr[20];
    srand(time(NULL));
    int temp;

    temp=rand()%20;

    int x=0;



      while(x<20)
      {
          if(x==0)
          {
              arr[x]=temp;
              x++;
          }
          else
          {
                  for(int j=1;j<=x;j++)
                  {
                     do
                      {
                          temp=rand()%20;  
                      } while(temp==arr[x-j]);
                  }
                  arr[x]=temp;
                  x++;
           }
      }

      for(int i=0;i<20;i++)
        {
        printf("%d. %d \n",i,arr[i]);
        }



}

Here's the output:

  1. 10
  2. 1
  3. 6
  4. 2 <-- repeated
  5. 13
  6. 19
  7. 2 <--
  8. 19
  9. 4
  10. 19
  11. 14
  12. 18
  13. 12
  14. 2 <--
  15. 17
  16. 15
  17. 0
  18. 1
  19. 18
  20. 8

Thanks in advance :D

share|improve this question
    
What the question is? –  MeNa Nov 26 '13 at 10:26
1  
Consider starting with an array containing integers from 0 to 19 and using the Fisher-Yates shuffle algorithm, rather than building up the array by generating each element with values that aren't present in previous elements... –  Thomas Nov 26 '13 at 10:29
    
As @Thomas said, if you want to numbers in the range of 0 to 19 with no duplicates then start with those numbers and shuffle them. –  Retired Ninja Nov 26 '13 at 11:00
    
Just edited the question to fix some typos (like wrong "differen" instead of correct "differenT" in the title). –  Mr.C64 Nov 26 '13 at 11:37
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

void main(){
    int arr[20];
    srand(time(NULL));
    int temp;

    temp=rand()%20;

    int x=0;

    while(x<20)
    {
          if(x==0)
          {
              arr[x]=temp;
              x++;
          }
          else
          {
              int j;
              do
              {
                  temp=rand()%20;
                  for(j=0;j<x;j++)
                  {
                      if ( temp==arr[j] ) break;
                  }
              } while ( j < x );
              arr[x]=temp;
              x++;
           }
     }

     for(int i=0;i<20;i++)
       {
       printf("%d. %d \n",i,arr[i]);
       }

}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks it works :D –  DonnyAgusto Nov 26 '13 at 11:26
add comment
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
...
vector<int> vec;
for (int i=0; i < 20; ++i) vec.push_back(i);

random_shuffle(vec.begin(), vec.end());
share|improve this answer
1  
Not re-implementing the wheel is great, but std::random_shuffle isn't so great - if you can use C++11, you should strongly prefer std::shuffle with an appropriate engine from <random> instead. std::random_shuffle is still allowed to be based on rand() internally (and often still is, for compatibility reasons), which means it inherits all sorts of exciting and subtle flaws. @Stephan T. Lavavej gave a great talk at this year's Going Native conference that includes some discussion on this (see 23:30 or so): channel9.msdn.com/Events/GoingNative/2013/… –  Dan Bjorge Nov 26 '13 at 11:20
    
@DanBjorge Even though I like this approach, there are many things that may seem way too magical for a person who had not used them before. On the other hand, the implementation with random_shuffle is quite clear and concise. –  yasen Nov 26 '13 at 15:52
add comment

Think about your loop

for(int j=1;j<=x;j++)
{
     do
     {
          temp=rand()%20;  
     }while(temp==arr[x-j]);
}

Take for example the position when x=8. This will loop through j=1 to j=7. It will keep generating a number until it's not the same as the current number being checking in the array until the start of the array is reached. However, consider when j=7 is reached. When a new number is generated it may not be the same as the first element in the array, so the do-while loop will be exited; but, it may still be the same as other numbers in your array?

You need to (for each element): generate a random number. Check it doesn't match any of the numbers in the array. If it does start again, if it doesn't set the array number and continue.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can prepare a std::vector storing unique numbers in your desidered range, then shuffle it using std::shuffle().

Note that rand() is considered harmful, so you may want to use a better pseudo-random number generator, like Marsenne Twister engine std::mt19937.

Compilable commented code follows:

#include <algorithm>    // for std::shuffle
#include <iostream>     // for std::cout
#include <random>       // for std::mt19937, std::random_device
#include <vector>       // for std::vector
using namespace std;

vector<int> PrepareUniqueRandomNumbers(const int count) 
{
    // Prepare the vector with unique numbers 0,1,2,...,(count-1)
    vector<int> numbers;
    numbers.reserve(count);
    for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
        numbers.push_back(i);    

    // Use Mersenne Twister engine as pseudo-random number generator
    random_device rd;
    mt19937 prng(rd());

    // Shuffle the vector, so the numbers
    // appear in a (pseudo-)random order.
    shuffle(numbers.begin(), numbers.end(), prng); 

    return numbers;
}

int main() 
{
    const auto numbers = PrepareUniqueRandomNumbers(20);
    for (auto x : numbers)
        cout << x << '\n';     
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You do not need to use a vector if you already know that you will store only 20 numbers. The rand() function is obsolete and not really good C++ style. You also do not need the Mersenne-Twister as engine for your intentions, that is absolutely not necessary.

#include <array>
#include <random>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    std::array<int, 20> randomNumbers = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20};
    std::random_device randomDevice;
    std::default_random_engine engine(randomDevice());
    std::shuffle(randomNumbers.begin(), randomNumbers.end(), engine);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.