Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It's probably a trivial question, but I am trying to plot a bar chart with matplotlib and with rotated text on the x axis. The code I'm using is shown below:

fig = plt.figure()

x_labels_list = []

for i in range(0, pow(2, N)):
    x_labels_list.append(str(f(i)))  # The function f() converts i to a binary string

ax = plt.subplot(111)
width = 1.0
bins = map(lambda x: x-width, range(1,pow(2,N)+1))
ax.bar(bins, my_data, width=width)
ax.set_xticks(map(lambda x: x-width/2, range(1,pow(2,N)+1)))
ax.set_xticklabels(x_labels_list, rotation=90, rotation_mode="anchor", ha="right")

It works perfectly, but I obtain an annoying white space on the right of the x axis, as shown by the red ellipse in the following picture:

enter image description here

Do you know how I can remove it? Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Can you post a working example which replicates the figure you're showing? –  Rutger Kassies Nov 26 '13 at 13:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try calling plt.xlim() with the number of bins, e.g.

plt.xlim([0,bins.size])

Here is an example:

#make some data
N = 22
data = np.random.randint(1,10,N)
bin = np.arange(N)  
width = 1

#plot it
ax = plt.subplot(111)
ax.bar(bin, data, width, color='r')
plt.show()

No plt.xlim() output:

no xlim

Now plot it with plt.xlim using the number of bins to define the size:

#plot it
ax = plt.subplot(111)
ax.bar(bin, data, width, color='r')
plt.xlim([0,bin.size])
plt.show()

Results it:

with xlim

There may be a better way, but this should work for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, it works perfectly! –  user2983638 Nov 26 '13 at 13:39
8  
You can also use plt.axis('tight') to accomplish the same thing without having to worry about specifying the number of bins. Also, if you'd prefer a bit of space at the edges, use plt.margins(0.05, 0) to pad the limits with 5% of the data range in the x-direction and 0% in the y-direction. –  Joe Kington Nov 26 '13 at 14:51
    
@Joe Kington: Yes, I have tried also your solution, and it works! –  user2983638 Nov 26 '13 at 15:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.