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I read that it is good practice to do a check in the destructors of classes after deletion for pointer data members as follows:

if( 0 != m_pPointer)
{
    delete m_pPointer;
    m_pPointer= 0;
}

However, I found out that this prevents you to declare const pointers as data members as follows:

Type* const m_pPointer;

Isn't assigning NULL to pointers(as in my example above) a barrier for const-correctness? What is the best way to do? Keep everything const and stop assigning NULL to the deleted pointer or declaring non-const pointers even though their address never changes?

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6  
I'd disagree that it's a good practice. Double-deleting a pointer is almost always a logic bug in your application, and setting the pointer to null after deletion hides that bug. If you don't set it to null, the app will probably crash, which is a good thing. –  JohannesD Nov 26 '13 at 10:34
1  
Do you have a use-case where setting the pointer to 0 actually helps with anything? I've seen this pattern before, but I can't see it helping unless you export references the pointer. –  juanchopanza Nov 26 '13 at 10:34
1  
@JasonSwartz no it won't crash on deleting a null pointer. delete p; where p is null is defined by the language as a no-op. See operator delete for more info on that. –  WhozCraig Nov 26 '13 at 10:37
2  
The question is asking how to use the wrong tool in the least wrong way. Why aren't you using smart pointers? –  Mike Seymour Nov 26 '13 at 10:39
1  
@JasonSwartz: if the pointer isn't shared, and it's only deleted in the destructor, yes, it's very hard to accidentally cause a double delete. On the other hand, if that is the case, it makes no sense to make the code more complicated by resetting the pointer to null -- we're in the destructor and the pointer is never seen after that! (except maybe in a case of heap/stack corruption) –  JohannesD Nov 26 '13 at 10:39

4 Answers 4

This is bad practice for the following reasons:

  1. Setting a pointer to null in the destructor may mask double destruction problem. Good practise is to detect problems as early as possible.
  2. Checking a pointer for null before deleteing it only adds unnecessary code. delete handles null pointers by doing nothing. Good practice is to minimize the amount of code.
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Agreed. The if check goes wasted and is an unnecessary burden. –  ChaZ Nov 26 '13 at 10:45
    
So is or is not ok to have constructions like delete m_pPointer; m_pPointer= 0; in our code? Assigning NULL to a pointer guarantees that if something is later called on that pointer the program will crash. Isn't it this a good thing? –  Jacob Krieg Nov 26 '13 at 10:48
2  
@JasonSwartz Are you going to show the example of how it is possible to call something on that pointer later? If you manage to do that, you will see it is quite contrived, and a poor design. And you would just be shifting the problem elsewhere anyway. –  juanchopanza Nov 26 '13 at 10:52
    
@juanchopanza Again, the goal of setting to null is to detect early that there is poor design... If everybody codes perfectly it is not needed. Alas it is not the case. –  Johan Nov 26 '13 at 10:53
    
By the way, it is what is done in the STL for vector at least (Visual studio 10)... pointers are set to NULL and everything is cleaned. –  Johan Nov 26 '13 at 10:59

Deleting a null pointer is guaranteed safe, so that null check is pointless.

If a class has a member that is a const pointer to a non-const object then you're saying the pointer value WILL NOT change within the lifetime of the wrapping object - that being the case you should only do this in the case where the object pointed to will live as long or longer than the wrapping object and the wrapping object will never want to point to a different object.

The fact that you have this issue simply means you've used a const pointer in the wrong place. You claim that in your case the pointer value never changes, but in your example it obviously does - it changes to null.

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The point of the question is whether the value should change to null. And the answer to that is, no, it should not, and it should be const. –  JohannesD Nov 26 '13 at 10:43
    
Possibly, in your real world case, which cannot be derived from the snippet. That said, when a member pointer is deleted and reassigned multiple times in a wrapper object's lifetime it can be a fair strategy to always ensure the pointer either points to an object or to null, then re-creation of the object can simply delete then new. If the object pointed to is instantiated in the initialiser list and destroyed in the destructor, then there's no need to set it to null and it can be a const pointer - or even better just put it on the stack. –  Grimm The Opiner Nov 26 '13 at 10:58

A weird situation can be caused when you use a static lib with a global object from two different share object (on Linux) which later linked to the same executable.

Each share object insert call to constructor and destructor, so you'll have one object and two calls for constructor and destructor for the same object (actually you'll have 2 objects mapped to the same address).

You'll probably find the problem when the 2nd destructor crash. if you NULL it you'll never know that there was a problem at all.

for your question: I think you should distinct two types of pointers: See the class below:

class A{
  obj *x, *y;
  A(){
    x = new obj;
    y = NULL
  }
  ~A(){
    delete x;
    if(y)delete y; // the `if` here will save the calling and returning run time when NULL. 
  }
  void RecicleX(){
    delete x;
    x = new obj;
  }
  void InitY(){
    assert(y==NULL); //illegal to call init when already
    y = new obj;
  }
  void TermY(){
    assert(y); //illegal to call term when already
    delete y;
    y = NULL; //prevent crush in dtor if called after...
  } 
};

x is always exists, so no need to check, and no need to null. y may exists and my not, so I think you should null it after delete. (You maybe will want also to know the current state, like for assert)

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The "best way to do" is:

class foo {
  std::unique_ptr<bar> m_pPointer;
public:
  foo(std::unique_ptr<bar> pPointer)
    : m_pPointer{std::move(pPointer)} {}
};

or for const,

class foo {
  const std::unique_ptr<bar> m_pPointer;
public:
  foo(std::unique_ptr<bar> pPointer)
   : m_pPointer{std::move(pPointer)} {}
};

No new, no delete, no destructor.

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