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I just understand that LinkedHashSet does not allows duplicate elements when it is inserting. But, I dont understand how does Hashset works in java? I know a bit that Hashtable is used in Hashset so the hashtable used to store the elements and here also does not allow the duplicate elements. Then, Treeset is also similar to Hashset it also does not allows duplicate entries so unique elements will be seen and it follows ascending order.

I have one more doubt regarding HashMap - Hashmap does not maintains order. It may have one null key and multiple null values. I just dont understand this and what does it mean actually? Any practical example for this?

I know a bit, Hashmap used to work based on this - Key and values used to put in buckets also bucket has unique numbers. So that, can identify and get the key and value from the buckets. When I put the key/value pair in the bucket of which identifier is the hash code of the key. For an eg: Hash code of the key is 101 so it is stored in bucket 101. One bucket can store more than key and value pairs. Suppose take an example as Object1 is "A", object2 is "A"and object3 is "B" then it has a same Hash code. So, it stores the different objects by sharing the same Hashcode in same bucket. My doubt is, objects with same Hashcode should be equal and different objects should have different Hashcodes??

I am beginner please clarify my doubts and apologizing for this kinda silly doubts!

This is the program using HashSet,

    import java.util.*;
    public class Simple{
    public static void main(String[] args){
    HashSet hh=new HashSet();
    hh.add("D");
    hh.add("A");
    hh.add("B");
    hh.add("C");
    hh.add("a");        
    System.out.println("Checking the size is:"+hh.size()+"");
    System.out.println(hh);

    Iterator i=hh.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()){
    System.out.println(i.next());
    }      
    }
    }

Output is,

Checking the size is:5
[D, A, B, a, C]
D
A
B
a
C

My doubt is, why "a" is inserting in between "B" and "C".

Now, I am using LinkedHashSet so,

public class Simple{
public static void main(String[] args){
    LinkedHashSet hh=new LinkedHashSet();
            hh.add("D");
            hh.add("A");
    hh.add("B");
    hh.add("C");
            hh.add("a");  

        System.out.println("Checking the size is:"+hh.size()+"");
    System.out.println(hh);

    Iterator i=hh.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()){
        System.out.println(i.next());
    }      
}
}

I just understand that, it follows insertion order and it avoids duplicate elements. So the output is,

Checking the size is:5
[D, A, B, C, a]
D
A
B
C
a

Now, Using Treeset :-

import java.util.*;
public class Simple{
public static void main(String[] args){
    TreeSet hh=new TreeSet();
            hh.add("1");
            hh.add("5");
            hh.add("3");
            hh.add("5");
            hh.add("2");
            hh.add("7");  

System.out.println("Checking the size is:"+hh.size()+"");
System.out.println(hh);

    Iterator i=hh.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()){
        System.out.println(i.next());
    }      
}
}

Here, I just understand that - Treeset follows ascending order.

The output is,
Checking the size is:5
[1, 2, 3, 5, 7]
1
2
3
5
7

Then my doubt is, how does Hashset works in Java? And I know that, LinkedHashset follows doubly linkedlist. If it uses doubly linked list then how does it stores the elements? What does mean by doubly linkedlist and how does it works? Then where all these three Hashset, Treeset, Linkedhashset would be used in Java and which one has better performance in java?

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1  
such a huge topic to give you answer here better first study thouroghly – shreyansh jogi Nov 26 '13 at 12:45
2  
Why do you ask here when the official documentation answers all your questions? – Adam Arold Nov 26 '13 at 12:46
2  
Downvoted because you didn't google it first. – lscoughlin Nov 26 '13 at 12:46
1  
Maybe it is not duplicate since you are asking about Sets but this seems similar: stackoverflow.com/questions/2889777/… – Pshemo Nov 26 '13 at 12:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

My doubt is, why "a" is inserting in between "B" and "C".

A TreeSet orders the entries.

A LinkedHashSet preserves the insertion order.

A HashSet does not preserve the order of insertion, and is does not sort/order the entries. That means that when you iterate over the set, the entries are returned in an order that is hard to fathom ... and of no practical significance. There is no particular "reason" that "a" is inserted at that point. That's just how it turned out ... given the set of input keys and the order in which they were inserted.

My only doubt is, how does Hashset works in Java.

It is implemented a hash table. Read the Wikipedia page on hash tables for a general overview, and the source code of java.util.HashMap and java.util.HashSet for the details.

The short answer is that HashSet and HashMap are both a hash table implemented as an array of hash chains.

And I know that, LinkedHashset follows doubly linkedlist. If it uses doubly linked list then how does it stores the elements?

LinkedHashSet is essentially a hash table with an additional linked list that records the insertion order. The elements are stored in the main hash table ... and that is what provides fast lookup. Again, refer to the source code for details.

What does mean by doubly linkedlist and how does it works?

Read the article in Wikipedia on doubly linked lists.


Then where all these three Hashset, Treeset, Linkedhashset would be used in Java and which one has better performance in java?

There are a number of things to think about when choosing between these three classes (and others):

  • Do they provide the required functionality. For example, we've already seen that they have different behaviour with respect to the order of iteration.

  • Do they have the required concurrency properties? For example, are they thread-safe? do they deal with contention? do they allow concurrent modification?

  • How much space do they require?

  • What are the performance (time) characteristics.

On the last two points?

  • A TreeSet uses the least space, and a LinkedHashSet uses the most.

  • A HashSet tends to be fastest for lookup, insertion and deletion for larger sets, and a TreeSet tends to be slowest.

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Your answer is very helpful to understand, thanks ! – Meena Rengarajan - blueGem Nov 26 '13 at 13:27

I'll be succinct.

A Set follows the math theory of sets. A Set (AbstractSet is the supertype in Java) is similar to a list except it cannot have the same element twice.

HashSet implements it with a HashMap, TreeSet implements it with a Tree, LinkedHashset implements it with a doubly-linked list.

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1  
In fact LinkedHashSet uses a LinkedHashMap which extends HashMap. Basically it is a decorator for a HashMap. – Adam Arold Nov 26 '13 at 12:49
    
Interesting, thanks. The point is, you shouldn't really care what's behind it as long as they do not allow duplicates :) – Pierre Arlaud Nov 26 '13 at 13:06

First of all, you need to know that all Set implementations share the same feature: they don't allow duplicates. It's not just a feature of the LinkedHashSet.

Second, one important difference is that, out of the 3 set types you asked about, the TreeSet is a sorted set, that is elements are ordered according to their natural ordering or according to a logic described imperatively using a Comparator or implementing the Comparable interface.

Switching to the difference between HashSet and LinkedHashSet, please note that LinkedHashSet is a subclass of HashSet. They are not sorted sets.

HashSet is the fastest implementation of a set and it ensures the uniqueness of elements using (first) their hash value returned by the hashCode() method and (then) their equals() method. Behind the scenes, it uses a HashMap.

The LinkedHashSet ensures consistent ordering over the elements of the set with the help of a LinkedList, which basic HashSets do not provide.

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  • HashSet does't preserve the order of elements.So you can't identify its order.
  • LinkedHashSet preserve the order as elements are added in set. It keep the order as we insert in it.

  • TreeSet maintains the order of element. TreeSet is slowest because it arrange its elements after every element addition or deletion.

    Otherwise it all repends on your requirement , whether you need ordered list, thread-safe etc.

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