Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm tryin to capture the follwoing from the below lines in my file:

1.39223 0.303787
71.9792 0

Input file (example):

XLOC_000559 XLOC_000559 -   S3603:13352-18211   con exp OK  1.39223 0.303787    -2.19627    -1.93877    0.0001  0.0140909   yes
XLOC_001511 XLOC_001511 -   S7778:1319-1421 con exp OK  71.9792 0   -inf    -nan    0.00035 0.0365407   yes

I've tried the regex:

my ($con_val, $expt_val) = ($1, $2) if ($_ =~ /OK\t(\d+\.\d+)\t(\d+\.\d+)/);

But its not working on 0 values...

Can anyone help please?

share|improve this question
    
If you have received a satisfactory solution then you should mark it as accepted. If not, then please describe what additional problems you are having. –  Borodin Nov 27 '13 at 8:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is almost certainly no need to make sure your numbers contain a maximum of one decimal point, and the easiest way to solve this is to use a character class [\d.] that matches any digit or a dot.

Note that a regex will be applied to $_ unless you say otherwise, so there is no need to write $_ =~.

This short program should help you.

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<DATA>) {
  next unless /OK\s+([\d.]+)\s+([\d.]+)/;
  my ($con_val, $expt_val) = ($1, $2);
  print "$con_val, $expt_val\n";
}

__DATA__
XLOC_000559 XLOC_000559 -   S3603:13352-18211   con exp OK  1.39223 0.303787    -2.19627    -1.93877    0.0001  0.0140909   yes
XLOC_001511 XLOC_001511 -   S7778:1319-1421 con exp OK  71.9792 0   -inf    -nan    0.00035 0.0365407   yes

output

1.39223, 0.303787
71.9792, 0
share|improve this answer
    
it'll match 11.22.33 and utf digits outside [0-9] which is by some considered as ultimate mistake/evil. :o –  mpapec Nov 26 '13 at 17:49
    
@mpapec: If you really want to verify your data as well as extracting the correct data fields then it is best to do that separately. Just because regexes can do everything at once it doesn't mean you should use them that way. You wouldn't consider doing it with any other language. –  Borodin Nov 26 '13 at 18:09
    
Thanks this works great! –  user2729360 Nov 27 '13 at 22:33

You have to make the \.\d+ optional by wrapping it in parentheses with a ?:

/OK\t(\d+(?:\.\d+)?)\t(\d+(?:\.\d+)?)/

The ?: after the open-paren prevents the regex engine from creating a grouping in the match result.

share|improve this answer
use Regexp::Common;
my ($con_val, $expt_val) = /OK\s+ ($RE{num}{real}) \s+ ($RE{num}{real})/x;

or

perl -anE 'say "@F[7,8]"' file
share|improve this answer
    
whats the num and real doing? –  user2729360 Nov 26 '13 at 13:16
    
@user2729360 these are regex definitions for matching common patterns like decimal numbers above. –  mpapec Nov 26 '13 at 13:22

Assuming the second value (that you want to capture as '$expt_val') is always followed by a tab character, this should work:

my ($con_val, $expt_val) = ($1, $2) if ($row =~ /OK\t(\d+\.\d+)\t(.+)\t/);
share|improve this answer

You should use the or operator | to specify either:

  • One or more digits (\d+) followed by a literal . (\.) followed by one or more digits (\d+)

OR

  • A literal 0

Try this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict; 
use Data::Dumper;

my @array =('XLOC_000559    XLOC_000559 -   S3603:13352-18211   con exp OK  1.39223 0.303787    -2.19627    -1.93877    0.0001  0.0140909   yes',
    'XLOC_001511    XLOC_001511 -   S7778:1319-1421 con exp OK  71.9792 0   -inf    -nan    0.00035 0.0365407   yes');

foreach (@array){
    my ($con_val, $expt_val) = ($1, $2) if ($_ =~ /OK\t(\d+\.\d+|0)\t(\d+\.\d+|0)/); 
    print "$con_val\t$expt_val\n";
}

Outputs:

1.39223 0.303787
71.9792 0

Or better yet, assuming your values are separated by a \t, I'd go for this:

my (@con_val, @expt_val);
foreach (@array){
    my @split = split(/\t/);
    push @con_val, $split[7];
    push @expt_val, $split[8];
}

print Dumper \@expt_val;
print Dumper \@con_val;

Outputs:

$VAR1 = [
          '0.303787',
          '0'
        ];
$VAR1 = [
          '1.39223',
          '71.9792'
        ];
share|improve this answer
    
In the second they are beackward? –  user2729360 Nov 26 '13 at 13:14
    
Dont worry : my mistake! –  user2729360 Nov 26 '13 at 13:16
    
This assumes that any integer other than zero will have a decimal point and trailing zeroes. I think it's much more likely that, for example, three will appear as just 3 rather than 3.000000. –  Borodin Nov 26 '13 at 14:37
    
Good point - @user2729360? –  fugu Nov 26 '13 at 17:15
    
Borodins right - they would be 3 not 3.0 –  user2729360 Nov 27 '13 at 22:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.