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I've read the MSDN documentation on C# generic type parameter constraints several times, but I cannot figure out how to do this, or determine if it's even possible.

Say I have a generic base class like this:

public abstract class Entity<TId> { ... }

This abstract base class does not have any type constraints, TId can be anything -- a struct, class, etc.

Now say I have a generic interface method, and I want to constrain the generic types on the method to the above class:

public interface ICommandEntities
{
    void Update<TEntity>(TEntity entity) where TEntity : ?????;
}

I can get this to compile:

public interface ICommandEntities
{
    void Update<TEntity, TId>(TEntity entity) where TEntity: Entity<TId>
}

...however then I need to explicitly add both T1 ant T2 generic args when executing the method:

commander.Update<AbcEntity, string>(abcEntity);

If possible, I would like to make the compiler infer everything, so that I can execute the method like this:

commander.Update(abcEntity);

Is this event possible? So far the only way I can get it to work is by adding an empty, non-generic base class above the generic base class and using it as a type constraint on the method:

public abstract Entity {}

public abstract EntityWithId<TId> : Entity { ... }

public interface ICommandEntities
{
    void Update<TEntity>(TEntity entity) where TEntity : Entity;
}

commander.Update(abcEntity);

... but then I end up with a pretty useless class that acts as a marker interface. Is that the only way to get away with this type of generic class & interface method design? Or am I missing something here?

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1  
void DoAbc<TForInterface>(BaseClass<TForInterface> impl); would work, but I'm not sure if that's what you are looking for. –  Simon Belanger Nov 26 '13 at 13:31
1  
What I do not understand is the use of T2 if it is neither an input paramether nor a return value. –  SJuan76 Nov 26 '13 at 13:31
1  
Have you considered making the interface generic? –  Rowland Shaw Nov 26 '13 at 13:32
    
What about void doAbc<T1>(BaseClass<T1> impl)? –  SJuan76 Nov 26 '13 at 13:33
1  
In your updated example, I don't understand why you want your update to operate on two generic type when you have a base class. void Update<TId>(EntityWithId<TId> entity); is a good enough constraint, no? EntityWithId is an Entity, no need to put a generic constraint on an additionnal type argument. –  Simon Belanger Nov 26 '13 at 13:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After checking that it compiles, I will upgrade it to an answer.

From your question and comments, you want the parameter to be Entity<Something>. You do not need to use the parametrized types directly as a type, it can be use to parametrize a parameter.

So just do

 public void Update(Entity<T1> entity) where ....
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... Ok I think I'm getting it now, doing it this way, the interface method does not need any generic type constraints, if I use the base class as the method arg. Is that right? –  danludwig Nov 26 '13 at 13:45
    
What you do is define what type of parameter you want. You want Entity<X>, so all you need to parametrize is X. Don't forget the issues of covariance, maybe it is worth marking the type parameter as in. –  SJuan76 Nov 26 '13 at 13:52
    
The generic on Entity has no constraints though. It can be a string, int, long, or it can be a XyzCompositeId class. I don't think I want to apply any co- or contravariance here. –  danludwig Nov 26 '13 at 13:54
    
I don't know if I understand you. X will have the constraints defined in Entity parameter types (none in the code you provided). Also, you can specify the constraints that you want as IEntityCommand.Upload parameter types. I do not know if you are asking for confirmation that there are no constraints or if you want to define any. –  SJuan76 Nov 26 '13 at 13:59
    
Right, sorry for the confusion. I do not want any additional constraints on the interface method. I just don't want any code to be able to invoke the method passing an instance of a class that does not derive from Entity<X>. So you are correct, I could make X covariant for this method. –  danludwig Nov 26 '13 at 14:06

The simple option would be to change the signature of ICommandEntities:

public interface ICommandEntities
{
    void Update<TId>(Entity<TId> entity)
}

This effectively gives the same constraint that you're after.

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As stated in the comments, you should just make the parameter type BaseClass<T>

class Program
{
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        ITest x = new TestClass();

        Console.WriteLine( x.GetTypeArgTypeFrom( new BaseClass<int>() ) );

        Console.ReadKey();

    }
}

public class BaseClass<T>
{
    public Type GetTypeArgType()
    {
        return typeof( T );
    }
}

public interface ITest
{
    Type GetTypeArgTypeFrom<T>( BaseClass<T> bct );
}

public class TestClass : ITest
{
    public Type GetTypeArgTypeFrom<T>( BaseClass<T> bct )
    {
        return bct.GetTypeArgType();
    }
}
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