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I have a setup similar to below:

    [TestMethod]
    public void NoIntegers()
    {
        Mock<IBar> mockBar = new Mock<IBar>(MockBehavior.Strict);
        Mock<IEnumerable<int>> mockIntegers = new Mock<IEnumerable<int>>(MockBehavior.Strict);

        mockBar
            .SetupGet(x => x.Integers)
            .Returns(mockIntegers.Object);

        mockIntegers
            .Setup(x => x.Any())
            .Returns(false);

        Assert.IsFalse(new Foo(mockBar.Object).AreThereIntegers());
    }

    public interface IBar
    {
        IEnumerable<int> Integers { get; }
    }

    public class Foo
    {
        private IBar _bar;

        public Foo(IBar bar)
        {
            _bar = bar;
        }

        public bool AreThereIntegers()
        {
            return _bar.Integers.Any();
        }
    }
}

When it runs it fails to initialise the mock

Test method NoIntegers threw exception: System.NotSupportedException: Expression references a method that does not belong to the mocked object: x => x.Any<Int32>()

I have tries adding It.IsAny() in a few forms:

mockIntegers
    .Setup(x => x.Any(It.IsAny<IEnumerable<int>>(), It.IsAny<Func<int, bool>>()))
    .Returns(false);

// No method with this signiture


mockIntegers
    .Setup(x => x.Any(It.IsAny<Func<int, bool>>()))
    .Returns(false);

// Throws: Test method NoIntegers threw exception: 
// System.NotSupportedException: 
// Expression references a method that does not belong to the mocked object:
//  x => x.Any<Int32>(It.IsAny<Func`2>())

What do I need to mock in order for this to run?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to mock Integers property only. There is no need to mock Any() (you can't do it anyway because it's an extension method) because it is a part of SUT. Here's how you should do it for two cases:

[TestMethod]
public void NoIntegers()
{
    Mock<IBar> mockBar = new Mock<IBar>(MockBehavior.Strict);

    mockBar.SetupGet(x => x.Integers)
           .Returns(new List<int>());

    Assert.IsFalse(new Foo(mockBar.Object).AreThereIntegers());
}

[TestMethod]
public void HasIntegers()
{
    Mock<IBar> mockBar = new Mock<IBar>(MockBehavior.Strict);

    mockBar.SetupGet(x => x.Integers)
           .Returns(new List<int>{ 3, 5, 6});

    Assert.IsTrue(new Foo(mockBar.Object).AreThereIntegers());
}
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The problem with returning a concrete class is that I can't assert that nothing was changes on it. It is allot neater though. –  BanksySan Nov 26 '13 at 14:26
    
@BanksySan You don't need to test and mock everything. .NET BCL is a stable dependency, you have to assume it just works and test your own code. –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Nov 26 '13 at 14:29
    
I know not to test the framework, I meant the application code. The actual code is larger that the sample code I put up, I want to assert that nothing changes to the objects in the enumerable. –  BanksySan Nov 26 '13 at 14:35
    
@BanksySan You can return a ReadOnlyCollection instance from the mock. It will thrown an exception if collection is modified and your test will fail. –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Nov 26 '13 at 14:37
    
IEnumerable is also read-only, but that doesn't mean that the objects within it are immutable, they could still have properties changed... I have, however, come around to your solution. it ticks all the boxes and it allot easier to read. –  BanksySan Nov 26 '13 at 14:41

It does not work because the Any() method is not directly exposed by the IEnumerable<T> interface, but it is defined as an extension method on Enumerable.

I don't think you can set up a call to Any() on any mock, because it is essentially a static method.

In this case I think it's preferable to use an instance of IEnumerable<int> (ex: an int array) that can be set up to be empty/non-empty, depending on what you are testing.

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Aye, the static-ness was the problem. Got mislead by the error message. –  BanksySan Nov 26 '13 at 14:11

Fixed!

Not pretty, but this is the mocking that's needed:

   [TestMethod]
    public void NoIntegers()
    {
        Mock<IBar> mockBar = new Mock<IBar>(MockBehavior.Strict);
        Mock<IEnumerable<int>> mockIntegers = new Mock<IEnumerable<int>>(MockBehavior.Strict);
        Mock<IEnumerator<int>> mockEnumerator = new Mock<IEnumerator<int>>(MockBehavior.Strict);
        mockBar
            .SetupGet(x => x.Integers)
            .Returns(mockIntegers.Object);

        mockIntegers
            .Setup(x => x.GetEnumerator())
            .Returns(mockEnumerator.Object);

        mockEnumerator.Setup(x => x.MoveNext()).Returns(false);

        mockEnumerator.Setup(x => x.Dispose());

        Assert.IsFalse(new Foo(mockBar.Object).AreThereIntegers());
    }

    public interface IBar
    {
        IEnumerable<int> Integers { get; }
    }

    public class Foo
    {
        private IBar _bar;

        public Foo(IBar bar)
        {
            _bar = bar;
        }

        public bool AreThereIntegers()
        {
            return _bar.Integers.Any();
        }
    }
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