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Consider the following simple program:

static class Program
{
  static void Main()
  {
  }

  static void Method(short? x)
  {
    const int y = 50; // note: is Int32, but is const and within Int16 range
    var z = x ?? y;   // note: var keyword used; IDE is confused about the type!
    TakeOnlyInt16(z);
    z.OnThisInt16();
  }

  static void TakeOnlyInt16(short a)
  {
  }
  static void OnThisInt16(this short a)
  {
  }
}

There's absolutely nothing wrong with this program, and it compiles with no problem. (And you can run it, possibly including a call to Method from Main.)

However, the Visual Studio IDE has a wrong impression of the type of the local variable z. It seems to think z is an Int32 when it is actually an Int16 (a.k.a. short in C#). The problem shows in at least three situations:

  1. When you "hover" over (hold mouse over) the var keyword, it shows you Int32 in a tooltip. That is wrong.

  2. When you move the text (keyboard) cursor to within the statement TakeOnlyInt16(z); inside Method, it shows a little tip in the lower left corner of this statement, offering to "Generate method stub for TakeOnlyInt16 in Program". That is wrong because the method is clearly already there. But it seems to think the overload already present is wrong wrt. short and int.

  3. When you type z. (zed dot) inside Method, the members of Int32 come up in intellisense. Note that the overloads of CompareTo are the ones declared by Int32, not the ones declared by Int16. Also, the extension method is missing from the intellisense member list, when you type z..

Hope you understand my explanations without screenshots.

The question: Where does this bug come from? Is it well-known? Is it in older versions of Visual Studio as well?

I tried this in VS2013.

share|improve this question
1  
I'm not sure the IDE has done the optimization of making y a short. It probably looks at it it's type and the type of x and chooses the one that is broader. –  Prescott Nov 26 '13 at 15:03
4  
Nothing we can do about it, best place to report bugs like this is connect.microsoft.com –  Hans Passant Nov 26 '13 at 15:08
1  
My terminology is shaky here, but I believe an implicit widening conversion is happening since y is an int32. I would not expect '??' to be defined for (int16, int32) but it's usually permitted to upcast x to int implicitly. In other words, not a bug. –  Tom W Nov 26 '13 at 15:25
    
@Prescott The compile-time type of y must be int, and the compile-time type of z must be short. Overload resolution etc. must correspond to this fact. This is not about optimization. It is about the correct "formal" type of z. (Optimization would be if the runtime chose to represent one of the numbers in another way internally. We don't care about that. As long as the program works as required.) –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 26 '13 at 19:48
    
@TomW No, z is a short. How would the next two statements be legal if z were an int? There exists an implicit narrowing conversion from int to short when (and only when) it is a constant expression (compile-time literal) and the value is within the range of the destination type. See my comment to JotaBe's answer. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 26 '13 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

According to C# reference, the null-coalescing operator (??)

is used to define a default value for nullable value types or reference types. It returns the left-hand operand if the operand is not null; otherwise it returns the right operand.

If the right hand operand is int, and the left operand, when not null, is short, the compiler has to choose between int and short. And, as short can be implicitly converted to int (and not viceversa) the compiler correctly decides that the result of this expression is of int type.

Still not convinced? Why couldn't it be the other way round?. Mmmm, let's see what says the C# Language Specification, 7.13:

The type of the expression a ?? b depends on which implicit conversions are available on the operands. In order of preference, the type of a ?? b is A0, A, or B, where A is the type of a (provided that a has a type), B is the type of b (provided that b has a type), and A0 is the underlying type of A if A is a nullable type, or A otherwise.

If you still want to ignore the "implicit conversions available" part, as this could lead to think it should be A0 (short), let's keep on reading the spec:

Specifically, a ?? b is processed as follows:

•If A exists and is not a nullable type or a reference type, a compile-time error occurs.

•If b is a dynamic expression, the result type is dynamic. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is converted to dynamic, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated, and this becomes the result.

•Otherwise, if A exists and is a nullable type and an implicit conversion exists from b to A0, the result type is A0. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is unwrapped to type A0, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and converted to type A0, and this becomes the result. NOTE: this is not the case, there is no conversion from b (int) to A0 (short)

•Otherwise, if A exists and an implicit conversion exists from b to A, the result type is A. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and converted to type A, and this becomes the result.

•Otherwise, if b has a type B and an implicit conversion exists from a to B, the result type is B. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is unwrapped to type A0 (if A exists and is nullable) and converted to type B, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and becomes the result. NOTE: this is the case

•Otherwise, a and b are incompatible, and a compile-time error occurs.

So, no, the compiler is not buggy. You're making a wrong assumption.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for quoting very relevant parts of the C# specification! Note that b (which is called y in my example) is const of type int. There does exist an implicit constant expression conversion (see the C# Spec) from int to short. Therefore, in my case, there exist implicit conversions both from b to A0 and from a to B. So from the quotes you give yourself, the type of the ?? expression is A0. That is the underlying type of A. A is short?, so A0 is plain short. So the type is short. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 26 '13 at 18:02
    
Please try my code. If z were not a short, the two next statements could never compile ... –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 26 '13 at 18:04
    
I'll try your code. I overlooked that important detail. It makes it more interesting. Perhaps there is a nuance between implicit type conversion and constant value conversion. Which C# or Framework version are you using? Probably the debugger, or ILDASM will give a better explanation. –  JotaBe Dec 3 '13 at 0:54

The compiler sees:

const int y = 50; // note: is Int32, but is const and within Int16 range
var z = x ?? y;   // note: var keyword used; IDE is confused about the type!

and knows that y is of type int, whether or not it is const. This being the case, z is assumed to be Int32 as it is the bigger type.

If you are looking to make z of type short, try:

const int y = 50; // note: is Int32, but is const and within Int16 range
var z = x ?? (short)y;   // note: var keyword used; IDE is confused about the type!
share|improve this answer
    
You do realize that z was a short already in the first example? You are right that it is OK to write the (otherwise implicit) cast explicitly, as in (short)y, and in that case VS is not confused. But it doesn't answer my question. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 26 '13 at 18:18
    
@JeppeStigNielsen I thought we were talking about when you hover over the variable in the IDE? When you do this, it says it is of type int, like you described before. –  rhughes Nov 27 '13 at 0:57

It is a compiler optimization that maybe the editor is not able to show.

For example:

short? x = 44;
const int y = int.MaxValue;
var z = x ?? y;

var t = z.GetType(); //Int32

in this case the compiler realizes that z may end up containing a value that will not fit in an Int16 so it will declare z as an Int32.

in this other example:

short? x = 44;
const int y = 33;
var z = x ?? y;

var t = z.GetType(); //Int16

the compiler realizes that z will contain a value that will always fit in an Int16 so it will declare z as an Int16

share|improve this answer
    
You are right the implicit constant expression conversion from Int32 to Int16 exists only if the constant in question is within the range of the destination type, Int16. That is why I wrote in the code comment that 50 is in that range. This is not a "compiler optimization". The compiler is not allowed to mess with types. For example y.GetType() is required to always give Int32 no matter how tiny y is. The important thing is whether an implicit conversion exists from y to short. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 26 '13 at 18:15

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